Wells College News Archives 2004

Stories from the Wells college News Archives.

 

Wells Field Hockey Achieves New Heights in 2004 Conference Rankings

Lyn LaBar Voted Coach of the Year

Coach Lyn LaBarThe Wells field hockey team - the Express - made college history in the 2004 season earning second place in the Atlantic Women’s College Conference (AWCC).  This is the highest level the Wells team has attained since joining the conference in 1996.  The Express finished the season with a 5-2 conference record and a 5-8 record overall. 

Wells also received high honors for individual contributions to the sport:  Coach Lyn LaBar was voted 2004 AWCC Coach of the Year. Captain Kate McLaren ’04 received the AWCC Most Outstanding Player Award.  Midfielders Nicole Maryjanowski ’07 and McLaren were named to the All Conference First Team. Rookie Goalkeeper Ali Formicola ’06 was named to the All Conference Second Team along with leading scorer Samantha Schultz ’06. 

Coach LaBar said, “It is an honor to be recognized by my peers as AWCC Coach of the Year. I thank the team members and assistant coach Ace Dolan for their hard work and contributions. We enjoyed a very successful season in AWCC play, and I had a great time working with this squad. Their level of dedication, determination, and effort made my job very easy.” 

The AWCC Championship was held in early November at Trinity College in Washington, DC.  Coming in as the number one seed for the first time ever, Wells’ 3-2 overtime defeat of the Wilson College Phoenix kept them in the championship bracket and guaranteed them first or second place in the conference. 

This win pitted Wells against the Gators of the College of Notre Dame in the championship game.  The Express started the game slowly with two quick scores by the Gators in the first half but then held off the rush for the remainder of the game.  Offensively, the team came alive later in the second half making strong marches to the goal but could not get the ball in the back of the net and ultimately lost the game to the Gators 2-0. 

This is Lyn LaBar’s 16th season as the head coach of Wells’ field hockey program. She arrived at the college in 1989 as head field hockey and head lacrosse coach. In 1993, she was named athletic director and relinquished lacrosse coaching responsibilities. Prior to coaching at Wells, she was the head field hockey coach at Montclair State College from 1985-87 and assistant field hockey and lacrosse coach from 1984-85. 

LaBar is a 1984 graduate of Syracuse University where she played field hockey for four years and served as captain her senior year.  She earned her master's degree in physical education from Montclair State College in 1987, specializing in coaching and sports administration. 

LaBar has also been active outside of Wells serving the New York State Women’s Collegiate Athletic Association (NYSWCAA) as treasurer and executive council member (1994-97). Currently, she serves as President-Elect of the AWCC. She was also a regional committee member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and president of the AWCC (1997-98).

Founded in 1995, the AWCC has been recognized by the NCAA as a conference since 1999 and conducts conference championships in eight intercollegiate sports.  The eight members of the conference are: Chatham College, Chestnut Hill College, Hood College, Mary Baldwin College, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Trinity College, Wells College, and Wilson College.

December, 2004

 


Holiday Book Arts Open House to be Held at Wells College

Hands-on demos, exhibits, tours, and handmade items for sale

Celebrate the holiday season with a visit to the Wells College Book Arts Center. On Friday, December 3 and Saturday, December 4, the Center will host a holiday open house from 10:00 am – 6:00 pm each day. Saturday’s festivities coincide with the annual Christmas in Aurora celebration. Seasonal music and refreshments will set the mood, and the public is warmly invited to enjoy this special free holiday treat.

Talented Wells students will exhibit their work in letterpress printing, bookbinding, and calligraphy. Unique handmade books, cards, ornaments, wrapping paper, and other gifts will be on sale at affordable prices. Guests are welcome to tour the Book Arts Center studios, watch a printing demonstration, print a keepsake to take home, and shop for unique holiday gifts. 

Inspired by Victor Hammer, an internationally renowned calligrapher, painter, printer and type designer, the Wells Book Arts Center was established in 1993 to instruct in all areas of book arts and technologies. Hammer also founded the Wells College Press. Students in book arts classes at Wells learn the history and philosophy of their craft as they develop hand skills in the fabrication of books. They gain international perspective on book arts with visits from accomplished lecturers, writers, and artists, and with field trips to the area’s remarkable collection of libraries, presses, paper mills and binderies. Current classes teach design, typography, the evolution of letterforms, letterpress printing, bookbinding, and the history of the book. Though it embraces historical arts and technologies, the Center also actively investigates and incorporates innovations of our digital age. The Wells Book Arts Center supports the mission of the college by revealing the essential role of the book in Western culture and the liberal arts.

For more information about the holiday open house and the book arts at Wells College, please contact the Wells Book Arts Center by phone at 315-364-3420 or by email at bookartscenter@wells.edu, and visit the web:  www.wells.edu/bookarts.

November, 2004

 


Wells College Begins Recruitment for Men’s Athletics

New athletic teams to be added for 2005 

The Wells College Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is pleased to announce the addition of athletic opportunities for male students beginning in Fall 2005. In response to the Board of Trustees’ October decision to begin accepting men to the traditionally all-women’s college, Wells is now developing men’s soccer and swimming teams at the club level. 

Wells plans to expand intercollegiate athletic program opportunities for women and men during the next few years. “In the very near future, Wells will conduct a national search to secure a head coach for the men’s soccer program,” says Director of Athletics Lyn LaBar. “We are in the midst of preparing for that search, and are very excited about the addition of men's teams to our department.”

New head swim coach and aquatics coordinator David Warner will handle the responsibilities of recruiting for and coaching the men’s swim program. Once a soccer coach is hired, both will recruit prospective student athletes to Wells’ new programs.

The athletics staff has been working continually since the coeducation decision was announced to develop plans that are inclusive of men. These plans are expected to enhance male student recruitment efforts, which will contribute to overall enrollment growth.

Wells is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III member and currently offers six varsity women’s sports teams: field hockey, soccer, tennis, swimming, lacrosse, and softball. All six teams are members of the New York State Women’s Collegiate Athletic Association (NYSWCAA), while field hockey, soccer, swimming, softball and lacrosse compete in the Atlantic Women’s Colleges Conference (AWCC). When the men’s programs elevate to varsity status, they will participate at the NCAA Division III level. 

Wells offers students a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities. The Schwartz Student Center houses a swimming pool, gymnasium, weight room, a cardio room, and two tennis courts. Outdoor facilities include four tennis courts, softball field, boathouse, a 9-hole golf course, and both practice and game fields for field hockey, soccer, and lacrosse. 

For additional information about new developments in athletics at Wells College, please contact director Lyn LaBar at 315/364-3410.

November, 2004

 


Emily Dickinson Appears on Stage at Wells College

One-woman play “The Belle of Amherst” gives look at poet’s life

The Belle of AmherstThe Wells College Arts & Lecture Series Committee is pleased to announce that The Belle of Amherst will be presented on the Aurora campus next weekend. The one-woman show will take place on Saturday, November 20 at 7:30 p.m. in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall. Prices are $3 for students and children, $6 for senior citizens and the Wells College community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets are available at the door the night of the performance. Please call 315/364-3456 or 364-3428 to reserve seats.

Based on the life and poems of Emily Dickinson, The Belle of Amherst is an inspiring biographical portrait of a famous and eccentric spinster, who just happens to be one of America’s greatest literary figures. Ginger Grace stars as the passionate and mysterious poet in this moving theatre experience. 

Written by William Luce, directed by William Roudebush, and presented by Windwood Theatricals, The Belle of Amherst seamlessly weaves poetry and prose together in an entertaining and anecdotal revelation of Dickinson’s life and art, creating a portrait of the poet as a woman of deep sensitivity and lively intelligence with a wicked sense of humor. The audience will enjoy getting to know Emily, who remained secluded within the house and gardens of her father’s Massachusetts estate “The Homestead” for the last 30 years of her life while she wrote more than 1,700 unpublished poems.

The Belle of AmherstGinger Grace was most recently seen performing opposite Rich Little in the tour of The Presidents, playing all of the first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Hillary Clinton. Her off-Broadway credits include Gretchen in Faust, Anitra in Peer Gynt, and Ophelia in Hamlet.

The Wells College Arts & Lecture Series features professional guest artists and performers who are brought to campus to enrich the cultural and academic components of Wells as a learning community. The acts are selected annually by a committee comprised of Wells faculty, staff, administrators, and students.

For more information about The Belle of Amherst and the Wells Arts & Lecture Series, please contact Meagen Mulherin, assistant dean for campus involvement, at 315/364-3428. Additional information about Belle may be found at www.windwoodtheatricals.com.

November, 2004

 


“Bearing the Symbol: Women in the Muslim World Today”

Wells College students, Islamic scholar present panel discussion on women in Islam

Nadia Al-BagdadiWells College Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Hall announces that visiting Islamic Professor Nadia Al-Bagdadi and several Wells students will present a roundtable discussion on Monday, November 15. This special event, entitled “Bearing the Symbol: Women In The Muslim World,” will start with refreshments at 3:30 p.m. outside Cleveland auditorium. The discussion will begin promptly at 4:15 p.m., followed by a question and answer period. The public is warmly invited to attend this free event.

As part of her class “Islam in the Modern World,” Professor Nadia Al-Bagdadi has worked closely with her students to plan and execute the panel discussion “Baring the Symbol: Women In The Muslim World.” Topics will focus on several different contemporary issues affecting Islamic women today. 

“In the current political atmosphere, it is important to enter an engaged academic and public debate on Islamic matters, not only about but also with people from various parts of the Muslim world,” says Professor Al-Bagdadi. “The students in my class chose to research contemporary women in Muslim societies, a topic that is spotlighted perhaps too often in the media. Their goal, however, is to present another perspective by examining oversimplified stereotypes and exploring similarities and differences from their own experiences as young women in a modern world.”

Featured panel discussion presenters and topics are:

Nicole A Riley ’08 will be presenting “Unveiled: A Glance At Religious Symbols - The Cross And The Veil.” This portion of the program will take an in-depth look at the recent ban on the veil in France, and compares and contrasts the meaning of the veil to a Muslim to the significance of the cross to a Christian.

Joanna deSupinski ’08 will cover “Searching for an Islamic Identity in Turkey: Navigating the Labyrinth.” She will also speak on the formation of a woman’s identity through Islam, and the many false assumptions which currently exist surrounding Muslim tradition, women and the Islamic religion.

Seynabou Ndiaye ’05, Karima Bungudu ’06, and Amina Bungudu ’06 are foreign students from Senegal and Nigeria. They have teamed together to discuss “Understanding Western Conceptions of Muslim Women.” Their presentation will analyze the factors leading to Western misconceptions of Muslim women and how the media plays a role in creating this stigmatization. They will also touch on how existing Islamic customs and traditions have impacted the lives of Muslim women.

Brittany Campese ’06 will conclude the event with a multimedia presentation entitled,  “Iranian Feminist Film: Portrait of the Invisible.” She will be discussing transnational feminism, cross-cultural perspectives, and the social movements of the post-Islamic Revolution in Iran, comparing the correlation between filmmaking and feminist activism in Iran.

Professor Al-Bagdadi will serve as moderator for the panel discussion. Assistant Professor of Biology Christina Wahl will assist in facilitating this event. 

"Wells is so fortunate to host Dr. Nadia Al-Bagdadi as our visiting scholar of Islamic Studies for the fall semester," says Hall. "Dr. Al-Bagdadi has engaged her class fully in the study of modern Islam, and this panel discussion will be the culminating event in their collaborative work.”

Dr. Al-Bagdadi is a specialist in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies of the modern period. She earned her D. Phil. in Islamic Studies at the Free University Berlin. Her main field of research focuses on modern socio-cultural history, including literature, religion and print culture, in the Arab world, as well as on vision and visuality in classical Arab civilization. She is presently a long-term visiting professor at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, where she teaches in the History and Sociology/Social Anthropology Departments.

Professor Al-Bagdadi’s fellowship is sponsored through the “Understanding Contemporary Islam” program of the American University of Beirut in partnership with the Council for International Exchange of Scholars. The AUB has served as a bridge between East and West for more than 125 years. The University recently implemented the new “Understanding Contemporary Islam” program to expand the University’s existing emphasis on cross-cultural dialog. The program aims to increase the level of knowledge and understanding between Muslims and the West by sending scholars from the Islamic world to universities and colleges in the United States as visiting fellows who will serve as resources on Islam and life in contemporary Muslim societies.

The panel discussion is presented in honor of Dr. Abdul Hamid Hallab, director of the Understanding Contemporary Islam program and special advisor to the president of the American University of Beirut.  Dr. Hallab is touring the East Coast, visiting the scholars, including Al-Bagdadi, who are conducting residencies this semester through the CIES. He will be present at the panel discussion and may address the audience. Dr. Hallab also serves as special advisor for higher education to the ruler of Sharjah. 

For more information about the panel discussion “Baring the Symbol: Women In The Muslim World” and Professor Al-Bagdadi’s residency at Wells College, please call her directly at 315/364-3247.

November, 2004

 


Renowned Book Artist to Lecture at Wells College

Buzz Spector of Cornell University discusses “The Book in/as Landscape”

Buzz SpectorThe Wells College Book Arts Center is proud to announce that Buzz Spector will present the 20th Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 Memorial Book Arts Lecture. Mr. Spector’s presentation, entitled “The Book in/as Landscape,” will focus on a selection of his work as well as work in book form by a number of artists who work with metaphors of the land or of place. The lecture will be given at 7:30 pm on Friday, November 5 in the Art Exhibit Room of Macmillan Hall on the Wells College campus. The event is free and open to the public. A reception for the speaker will follow.

Buzz Spector is an artist and critical writer whose artwork has been shown in such museums and galleries as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh. His work makes frequent use of the book, both as subject and object, and is concerned with relationships between public history, individual memory, and perception. Spector has issued a number of artists’ books and editions since the mid-1970s, including most recently, Between the Sheets, a limited edition book published by The Ink Shop/Olive Branch Press of Ithaca, New York.

In 1978, Spector was a co-founder of WhiteWalls, a magazine of writings by artists, and served as the publication’s editor until 1987. Since then he has written extensively on topics in contemporary art and culture, and has contributed reviews and essays to a number of publications, including American Craft, Artforum, Art Issues, Dialogue, Exposure, New Art Examiner, and Visions. He is the author of The Book Maker’s Desire, a book of critical essays on topics in contemporary art and artists’ books (Umbrella Editions, 1995), and numerous exhibition catalogue essays, including Ann Hamilton: Sao Paulo & Seattle (University of Washington Press, 1992), and Dieter Roth (University of Iowa Museum of Art, 1999).

Spector earned his B.A. in art from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1972, and his M.F.A. with the Committee on Art and Design at the University of Chicago. In 1991 he was awarded a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship, and on three separate occasions he received National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship Awards. He is currently professor and chair of the Department of Art at Cornell University.

Buzz Spector’s lecture is part of the Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 Memorial Book Arts Lecture Series, a semi-annual event at Wells College which is made possible through the Heiland-Garretson Book Arts Lecture Fund, established by Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 and sustained through the generosity of her family.

Inspired by Victor Hammer, an internationally renowned calligrapher, painter, printer and type designer, the Wells Book Arts Center was established in 1993 to instruct in all areas of book arts and technologies. Hammer also founded the Wells College Press. Students in book arts classes at Wells learn the history and philosophy of their craft as they develop hand skills in the fabrication of books. They gain international perspective on book arts with visits from accomplished lecturers, writers, and artists, and with field trips to the area’s remarkable collection of libraries, presses, paper mills and binderies. Current classes teach design, typography, the evolution of letterforms, letterpress printing, bookbinding, and the history of the book. Though it embraces historical arts and technologies, the Center also actively investigates and incorporates innovations of our digital age. The Wells Book Arts Center supports the mission of the college by revealing the essential role of the book in Western culture and the liberal arts.

For more information about Buzz Spector’s lecture and the book arts at Wells College, please contact the Wells Book Arts Center by phone at 315-364-3420 or by email at bookartscenter@wells.edu, or visit us on the web at http://aurora.wells.edu/~wbac/bookarts/index.html

October, 2004

 


Wells College Partners with Cornell for 8th Annual Environmental Film Festival

Festival brings cinema with a message to region; Wells offers screening of “This Black Soil: A Story of Resistance and Rebirth”

This Black SoilWells College is one of several venues hosting films and filmmakers during the 8th annual Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival held from Friday, October 22 through Thursday, October 28. On Wednesday, October 27, Wells will present “This Black Soil: A Story of Resistance and Rebirth” at 7:00 pm in Cleveland Hall Auditorium. Filmmaker Teresa Konechne will be present for the free screening and will lead a discussion afterwards. The public is invited to participate.

The Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival returns for its eighth year as a showcase of films and performances with a message. More than thirty films ranging from documentaries and narratives to animation and comedic shorts will screen on six campuses and three other venues in Ithaca and surrounding areas. Most of the screenings feature an introduction and discussion with an expert on the film’s topic; five will be presented by their filmmakers or special guests.

In “This Black Soil: A Story of Resistance and Rebirth,” producer Teresa Konechne captures the power of participative democracy on film. Looking for an underdeveloped rural area with little political power, the state of Virginia thought it had found the perfect site to build a maximum-security prison in the town of Bayview. Although severely impoverished, the citizens successfully resisted the plan. Empowered by the experience, the town strove to recreate their village for a sustainable future, managing to secure enough money to purchase the prison site and work against all odds to remake their town along sustainable lines. “This Black Soil” chronicles Bayview’s struggle to build a prosperous future that respects the roots of this rural African-American community.

In addition to Wells, screenings will take place at Ithaca College, Cornell University, Longview, the Ithaca Sciencenter and the Museum of the Earth, Syracuse University and SUNY School of Environmental Science and Forestry, and at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva.

For additional information about the screening of “This Black Soil” at Wells College, please contact Professor of Anthropology and Religion Ernie Olson at 315/364-3206.

All screenings and discussions are open to the public and most are free of charge.  The Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival is presented by Ithaca College, the Cornell Center for the Environment, the Einaudi Center for International Studies, and Cornell Cinema, with support of other units at Cornell. Additional support is provided by the participating colleges and museums, and by WSP Environmental, Inc, part of WSP Group. More information may be found by calling 607/255-3522; detailed descriptions of the film festival and a full list of sponsors are available at the web site <http://www.ithaca.edu/fleff/>. 

October, 2004

 


Wells College Presents Pan-Asian Contemporary Modern Dance Concert

Wells dance students collaborate with guest performing artists from New York City

rebudalThe Wells College Performing Arts Department presents its all-women student company, Wells Dance Ensemble, and New York City guest performing artists Karen DiIuro and John Zullo. The fall dance concert will take place on Friday, November 12 and Saturday, November 13 at 7:30 pm in the Sommer Center. Tickets are available at the door the night of the performance. Prices are $3 students/children, $5 seniors/Wells community, and  $7 general admission. 

The evening’s program of contemporary modern dance with an Asian fusion blend will include choreographic works by Filipino-American Jeff Michael Rebudal, who is artistic director of the show and visiting professor of dance at Wells College. Among the dances performed will be Filipinese, Past (the Third), and Sarong Banggi. 

Rebudal explores the relationship between Filipino folk and contemporary modern dance in Filipinese, which celebrates womanhood and modern society’s diverse culture and lifestyles. This Pan-Asian dance will feature the full company and is performed to a mixed sound score including Filipino folk music by Ate Mariano and Ramon Obusan. As quoted by The Washington Post, Rebudal “weaves together images and gestures that suggest the complexity of Asian-American life.”

Guest performers Karen DiIuro and John Zullo will be featured with the ensemble in Past (the Third), danced to music by Phillip Glass and Musique. This piece delineates the idea that life has no boundaries and that in any given situation there are “shades of gray” and one’s role or responsibility is often blurred and overlapped with other coexisting thoughts and issues. According to the New Jersey Ledger, this is demonstrated through a “simple, yet powerful device: a line of white powder along the floor that ruled the space.” 

To complete the program, a solo titled Sarong Banggi (One Night) will be performed by Rebudal to music by Filipino violinists Gilopez and Corazon Kabayao. Lighting will be designed by Joe DeForest of Wells College, with costumes by Filipino costume designer Zeny Dio and Robin Burnosky.

Wells Dance Ensemble members are: Robyn Bookland ’05, Rachel Gaskill ’08, Ashante McLeod-Perez ’08, Zoe Malinchoc ’05, Christina Miglino ’07, Shelly Ray ’05, Whitney Sampson ’05, Elizabeth Sesera ’05, and Sarah Woodward ’06. 

Jeff Michael Rebudal is artistic director of the Manhattan-based Rebudal Dance and is an original founding member of the critically acclaimed Seán Curran Company in which he performed and toured throughout the nation and abroad from 1995 to 2003. Prior to moving to New York City in 1993, he performed professionally in Honolulu, where he has born and raised. He received an MFA in Performing Arts from The American University and a BA in Dance/ Journalism from the University of Hawaii-Manoa. Since 1996, Rebudal has worked in academia as visiting assistant professor at Connecticut College, the University of Oklahoma and currently at Wells College. He is a 2004 Fulbright finalist and a recipient of grants including the Asian- American Arts Alliance/JP Morgan Chase Regrant, Ruth and Seymour Klein Foundation, the 92nd Street Y - Harkness Space Grant, and the R.F. Johnson Grant.

Karen E. DiIuro has performed in New York City with Rebudal Dance since 2001 and is a recipient of the Richard Ellner Scholarship from Broadway Dance Center where she is on the faculty. Ms. DiIuro graduated magna cum laude from Connecticut College with degrees in both dance and international relations. 

John Zullo, originally of the Bronx, completed his MA in dance from The American University. He has performed works by Batsheva Dance Company, Heidi Latsky, Peter DiMuro and Dance Alloy. In NYC, he has performed for Andrew Jannetti, TAPFUSION and has been with Rebudal Dance since 2001. He also performed for Project Motion, Sister’s Trousers, and Tony Powell/Music & Movement in D.C. His own choreography has been presented at Dance Place, the American College Dance Festival, and Dance Space Center in NYC. He received the 1998 Emerging Choreographers Award from the Arts Club of Washington.

For more information about the fall dance concert and the Wells Dance Ensemble, please contact Jeff Michael Rebudal at 315/364-3213.

October, 2004

 


Poetry Reading and Writing Workshop at Wells College

Ralph Black shares his poetry, writing skills with students

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to welcome poet Ralph Black to the Aurora campus. The creative writing professor from Rochester will read from his work at 7:30 pm on Thursday, October 28 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the author. Refreshments will be served, and Black’s book will be available for purchase and signing.

Born and raised in Maryland, Ralph Black received his B.A. from the University of Oregon and his M.F.A. and Ph.D. degrees from New York University. His poetry has appeared in such journals as The Georgia Review, Orion, The Gettysburg Review, and Pequod, and has won awards from the Academy of American Poets and Chelsea. His first book of poems, Turning Over the Earth, was published by Milkweed Editions in 2000. Ralph has lived for periods of time in Italy and Ireland, and has taught at NYU, Davidson College, and Wake Forest University. He teaches creative writing at SUNY- Brockport, where he is co-director of the Brockport Writers Forum.

While on campus, Mr. Black will also participate in classes and present a poetry-writing workshop for students.

This reading and the Wells College Visiting Writer Series are made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.  Poets and writers are invited to campus throughout the academic year to meet with students, present writing workshops, and read from their respective works.

For more information about Ralph Black and the Visiting Writers Series at Wells College, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228.

October, 2004

 


Friends & Family Weekend 2004

Schedule of Events in PDF Format    (Requires Acrobat Reader)

October, 2004

 


Wells College Presents Off-Broadway Production

“Squeeze Box” is one-woman play featuring Ann Randolph

Squeeze Box
The Wells College Performing Arts Department is proud to announce the guest residency of Ann Randolph, playwright and actor direct from New York City. Ms. Randolph will present her one-woman comedy Squeeze Box on Saturday night, October 23 in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall. Curtain time is 8:30 pm. The performance is free for Wells students; $3 for students and children, $6 for senior citizens and the Wells College community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets are available at the door the night of the show.

With pathos and humor, Squeeze Box skillfully weaves together Ms. Randolph’s personal experiences of working in a women’s homeless shelter, and of her love affair with the accordionist of her dreams. Using her expressive face, acrobatic voice, and attuned body language, Ms. Randolph paints painfully funny portraits of the shelter’s residents.

Accompanied only by a chair, a banjo, and a guitar, Ms. Randolph brings to life her compelling and comical journey of discovery and self-acceptance with remarkable freshness and vibrancy. Squeeze Box illuminates the dignity and grace in unusual people and places, reflecting upon the relationship between where we are and where we expect to be.

“I was production manager for this off-Broadway show last summer, and had the pleasure of working with Ann Randolph and Alan Bailey again; we all are Ohio University alums,” says Susan Forbes, Wells theatre professor. “I am thrilled I was able to negotiate Squeeze Box’s showing here at Wells before the production goes on tour. Squeeze Box is expected to be made into a major motion picture in the next couple of years. Now our students can say they saw the original here first!”

While at Wells, Ms. Randolph will also offer a master class in playwriting and solo performance. 

Ann Randolph is a writer, performer, and filmmaker from Los Angeles. She wrote Squeeze Box while working in a women’s shelter for eight years. The play was originally staged at the Court Theatre in Los Angeles, where in 2002 it won the L.A. Theatre Alliance’s award for best solo performance. Ms. Randolph has performed her original monologues on NPR and PBS, and was a member of The Groundlings with Will Ferrell, Cheri Oteri, and Chris Kattan. Her credits include “Two Guys and a Girl” and “The Drew Carey Show.”

Squeeze Box has been playing at the Acorn Theatre in New York City, and is produced off-Broadway by Anne Bancroft and Mel Brooks, and directed by Alan Bailey.

For more information about Squeeze Box and the performing arts at Wells College, please contact theatre professor Susan Forbes at 315/364-3232.

October, 2004

 


Wells College Professor Invited to Give Lecture at Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Niamh O’Leary to speak on “Food: Think Globally, Act Locally”

Professor Niamh O'LearyCase Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio has invited a Wells College faculty member to speak at its annual Grazella Shepherd Lecture Day. Environmental Studies professor Niamh O’Leary will address attendees on Monday, October 18. This year’s Lecture Day theme is “Food: Think Globally, Act Locally.” 

Niamh O’Leary is associate professor of environmental studies at Wells College; she is currently on sabbatical leave for the Fall 2004 semester. On Lecture Day, O’Leary will address the topic “Food for the Future: Developing Crops for a New, More Sustainable Agriculture.” 

According to O’Leary, this lecture discusses how highly productive modern agricultural methods are in developed countries, “but this bounty comes at a cost,” she says. “Significant negative environmental effects…are among the concerns and challenges associated with industrialized agriculture…Shortages of fossil fuels, increased government regulations, and growing awareness of our obligations to the environment and to society have led to a new vision for the future of agriculture.” 

O’Leary will talk about how new agricultural methods will require genetic modification of crops to adapt them to a relatively unaltered farming environment. The other guest speaker, Professor Robert Paarlberg of the political science department at Wellesley College, will discuss “Why is Africa Still Hungry?”

The Grazella Shepherd Lecture Day is sponsored annually by the Association for Continuing Education at Case Western Reserve University. ACE is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing continuing education programs in cooperation with CWRU. Lecture Day is named in honor of Grazella Shepherd, who was the creative genius behind a unique educational lecture series that began in 1939 when she was the head of the General Educational Division of Cleveland College.

Lynn Reboul of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, (Wells Class of 1960) serves on the ACE Committee that organizes Lecture Day each year. Lynn was instrumental in bringing Professor O’Leary to Cleveland this fall. Other Wells faculty members have also spoken in the past: in October 1996, then-Assistant Dean Nan DiBello presented a talk entitled “Governments in the United States: Federalism, Politics, and Public Policy,” and professor Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo gave a presentation in October 2000 on “Globalization, Its Claims, and Its Contradictions with a Special Reference to International Political Economy and Democracy.”

For more information about Professor O’Leary’s lecture, please call Kelly Tehan at 315/364-3416. Additional information about Grazella Shepherd Lecture Day may be found by calling the Office of Continuing Education at Case Western (216/368-2090) or on their website at www.cwru.edu/artsci/conted/ace.htm.

October, 2004

 


Trustees Announce Decision

Wells will begin admitting men in the Fall of 2005

The Wells College Board of Trustees voted on Saturday, October 2, 2004 to admit men as matriculated undergraduate students. The college will begin enrolling men in the 2005-06 academic year. 

Wells College is a four-year, private liberal arts college located in Aurora, New York, on the eastern shore of Cayuga Lake. It was established in 1868 by Henry Wells, founder of the Wells Fargo Express and the American Express Company. Wells boasts small class sizes, an extensive experiential learning program, a diverse off-campus study program, and cross-enrollment with both Cornell University and Ithaca College. The academic program allows students substantial freedom to create individually unique educational experiences. In addition to becoming coeducational, the college is strengthening its off-campus study programs and introducing new initiatives in its Book Arts Center.

Coeducation has been considered by several Wells administrations over the course of at least four decades.  In fact, the college’s Charter was amended in 1969 to allow the college to grant degrees to men. For more than a year, Wells’ trustees had seriously been studying the possibility of coeducation to grow the college’s enrollment and financial resources. 

“For 40 years, Wells has made countless attempts to increase enrollment, including cutting tuition by 30%, adding new programs, trying innovative marketing and advertising campaigns, and increased spending on student aid,” said Stephen L. Zabriskie, chair of the Board.  “Yet we have not been able to get above an enrollment of 400 for a sustained period of time. From all the information we studied, it was clear to us that we had run out of time to continue as we were. It was time to change.”

For the current school year, residential enrollment is 302; and Wells needs at least 450 students living on campus, along with more commuters and other part-time students, to grow toward fiscal stability. 

“We have decided it is time to make everything Wells has to offer available to all potential students – both women and men,” said Lisa Marsh Ryerson, president of the college. “All the evidence made it abundantly clear that we could not grow our enrollment by remaining in our present state. We looked at nearly 200 liberal arts colleges, including a number of women-only colleges, and found that in nearly every case, applications and enrollments went up for colleges that made the transition from single-sex to coeducation. That is what we need for Wells College.”

A continued focus on the advancement of women will remain a key objective in the college’s new mission. “Wells will always be a small, close knit, high-quality liberal arts college, with our rich traditions as a women’s college. Even as we welcome more men to the campus, we will remain a college that honors women, and our deeply held values will still predominate,” she said. 

According to The College Board, only 3% of college-bound women consider an all-women’s school as their first choice for college. Other research indicates that after women-only institutions become coeducational, most of the enrollment increases came from women, and the campus population usually remains at about 80% female, even over the course of decades.

 “We believe that now many more prospective students will look at Wells and see it as a desirable destination, a place to get an excellent education in a beautiful environment. They will want to come here for our small class sizes and for the opportunity to interact closely with faculty.”

In a letter to alumnae announcing the decision, Ryerson wrote,  “Wells College confronted a stark choice: continue to shrink and decline until we were no longer viable, or choose to transform to fit new realities leading to an opportunity to survive and prosper. We chose change over decline. And we are committed to the future.”

October, 2004

 


Madcap Dance Trio Performs at Wells College

Galumpha combines acrobatics, comedy, pantomime, special effects

GalumphaThe Wells College Arts & Lecture Series committee is pleased to announce that Galumpha will perform its modern dance routine on the Aurora campus this fall. Everyone is invited to this eclectic and entertaining show on Saturday, October 16 beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall. Prices are $3 for students and children, $6 for senior citizens and the Wells College community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets are available at the door the night of the performance. Please call 315/364-3456 or 364-3428 to reserve seats.

Combining acrobatics, striking visual effects, physical comedy and inventive choreography, Galumpha brings to life a world of imagination, beauty, muscle, and merriment. Formerly known as the Second Hand Dance Company, the three performers from Binghamton have created a sensory feast of images ranging from the ridiculous to the sublime, drawn together into a seamless whole which consistently brings audiences to their feet. Galumpha is a triumphant mix of art and entertainment, offering world class, award winning choreography that is equally at home on the concert stage, at a comedy club, or at an outdoor festival.

GalumphaFormed in 2002 by Andy Horowitz and Greg O’Brien, and featuring newcomer Marlon Torres, Galumpha delivers a fast-paced, athletic brand of movement, distinctive for its ingenuity. Highlights include “Velcro” as seen on The Late Show with David Letterman and the 2002 MDA Jerry Lewis Telethon; and “Clackers,” seen on MTV, Showtime, and A & E. Horowitz and O’Brien are on the faculty of Binghamton University as Theater Department Artists-In-Residence. The trio will also offer a master class to Wells students the afternoon of the performance.

The Wells College Arts & Lecture Series features professional guest artists and performers who are brought to campus to enrich the cultural and academic components of Wells as a learning community. The acts are selected annually by a committee comprised of Wells faculty, staff, administrators, and students.

For more information about Galumpha and the Wells Arts & Lecture Series, please contact Meagen Mulherin, assistant dean for campus involvement, at 315/364-3428 and visit the college's website: www.wells.edu. Additional information about Galumpha may be found at www.galumpha.com.

October, 2004

 


Internationally Published Poet to Give Reading at Wells

Ann Jonas will read from her work, meet with students

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to welcome poet Ann Jonas to the Aurora campus. Jonas will read from her work at 4:30 pm on Thursday, October 14 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker. Jonas’ books will be available for purchase and signing.

Ann Jonas has published poems in literary journals and anthologies in England, Canada, and India as well as the United States. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Cecil Hemley Memorial Award of the Poetry Society of America and the Henry Rago Poetry Award of the New York Poetry Forum, as well as grants for residencies at Yaddo artist retreat center and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

Clandestine Press recently published a collection of her poetry, So Small This Arc, with an introduction by Wells College English professor Bruce Bennett. In his introduction, Bennett states: “So Small This Arc distills feelings, insights, and the hard-earned wisdom of a fully-lived life. Characters come alive, and when they speak, they are worth listening to.”

Ms. Jonas, a native Missourian, lives in Louisville, Kentucky. Her reading and the Wells College Visiting Writer Series are made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.  Poets and writers are invited to campus throughout the academic year to meet with students, present writing workshops, and read from their respective works.

For more information about Ann Jonas and the Visiting Writers Series at Wells College, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228.

October, 2004

 


Wells College Hosts Visiting Islamic Scholar

Dr. Nadia Al-Bagdadi presents public lecture, offers insight into "Understanding Contemporary Islam"

Nadia Al-BagdadiEllen Hall, vice president for academic affairs at Wells College, announces that Wells is hosting a visiting Islamic scholar for the Fall 2004 semester. In that role, Dr. Nadia Al-Bagdadi will be presenting a formal lecture entitled "Good Islam, Bad Muslims, and Public Spectacle" on Wednesday, October 13. The talk will take place at 7:00 pm in the Chapel, Main Building, and will be followed by a question and answer period. The public is invited to attend this timely presentation and meet Dr. Al-Bagdadi.

"Wells is so fortunate to host Dr. Nadia Al-Bagdadi as our visiting scholar of Islamic Studies for the fall semester," says Hall. "Dr. Al-Bagdadi has engaged her class fully in the study of modern Islam, and is making herself available for a large number of speaking engagements. She is doing an exceptional job of fulfilling the role envisioned for this new program sponsored by the American University of Beirut.”

Dr. Al-Bagdadi is a specialist in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies of the modern period. She earned her D. Phil. in Islamic Studies at the Free University Berlin. Her main field of research focuses on modern socio-cultural history, including literature, religion and print culture, in the Arab world, as well as on vision and visuality in classical Arab civilization. She is presently a long-term visiting professor at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, where she teaches in the History and Sociology/Social Anthropology Departments.

Professor Al-Bagdadi’s fellowship is sponsored through the "Understanding Contemporary Islam" program of the American University of Beirut in partnership with the Council for International Exchange of Scholars. The AUB has served as a bridge between East and West for more than 125 years. The University recently implemented the new “Understanding Contemporary Islam” program to expand the University’s existing emphasis on cross-cultural dialog. The program aims to increase the level of knowledge and understanding between Muslims and the West by sending scholars from the Islamic world to universities and colleges in the United States as visiting fellows who will serve as resources on Islam and life in contemporary Muslim societies. 

In addition to this lecture, while at Wells, Al-Bagdadi is teaching a seminar class entitled “Islam and the Modern World.” She will also host an informal discussion series, participate in several conferences and symposia, and will give the inaugural address for Seneca Falls Library’s new Wells College Lecture Series.

For more information about Dr. Al-Bagdadi’s fellowship and presentation, please call Professor of Religion Joseph Hoffmann at 315/364-3294 and visit the college's website: www.wells.edu. Additional information about the library’s lecture series may be found at www.senecafallslibrary.org.

October, 2004

 


Wells College Announces First Art Exhibit of the Academic Year

Equestrian photographer Michael Marten exhibits his work through Nov. 5

Azeri Defeats Sightseek by MJMarten 04The Wells College Art Department is pleased to announce that the horseracing photographs of Michael Marten will be the focus of its first exhibit of the 2004-2005 academic year. A selection of small and large format photos on stretched canvases will be on display in the String Room Gallery from October 6 - November 5, 2004. An opening reception will be held on Wednesday, October 6 from 7:00-9:00 pm in the Gallery; refreshments will be served and the artist will be present. The reception and exhibit are free and open to the public.

Michael Marten is a graduate of St. John’s University in Queens, NY, where he earned a B.F.A. in photography. His work takes him to racing venues worldwide, including Europe, Africa, Dubai, Great Britain, and across the United States. He is a nationally syndicated photographer with Horsephotos, Inc., which boasts such clients as The Daily Racing Form and the Houston Oilers. He is a two-time recipient of the Eclipse Award for Photography, presented in recognition of outstanding performances by horses and humans in Thoroughbred racing, and for outstanding coverage of the sport of horseracing. Marten currently resides in Del Mar, California.

Belmont Steam MJMarten 04String Room Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  The Gallery has recently undergone renovations, including the installation of new tract lighting.

For more information about the show and art classes at Wells, please contact art professor and String Room Gallery director William Roberts at 315/364-3237, or visit the college’s website at www.wells.edu. More information about Michael Marten may also be found on horsephotos.com, a photo stock library dedicated exclusively to equine-related photographic images.

September, 2004

 


Wells College Book Arts Center Expands Programs

New Director of Book Arts Initiatives, Victor Hammer Fellow added to staff

Margaret EckeThe The Wells College Book Arts Center, home of the Wells College Press, offers distinctive educational opportunities for students who want to combine book arts with writing, photography, or illustration. Program expansion is currently underway to include new summer institutes and workshops for book artists.

“Our Book Arts Center is a gem among academic programs that encourages individual self-discovery and collaboration,” said Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson. “Each year it reaches new heights, and the Wells community takes pride in the work being produced by book arts students, faculty, and staff. The center is a bridge connecting Wells’ tradition of academic excellence and dedication to quality with the future.” 

To meet the increasing needs of students and the public, Terrence Chouinard, director of the Center, recently announced that Wells has hired two creative new staff members:

Margot Ecke joins the Wells staff as the fourth Victor Hammer Fellow. Margot received her  M.F.A. from the Rhode Island School of Design and her B.F.A. from Cornell. She received the Professional Printing Certificate from the Tamarind Institute at the University of New Mexico and completed her training by earning her Certificate in Bookbinding at the North Bennett Street School in Boston, the only full-time bench bookbinding program in North America. Margot held a residency at the Carolina Rediviva Library in Uppsala, Sweden, in the summer of 2004, where she studied medieval bookbinding structures.  She has taught at both the North Bennett Street School and the Rhode Island School of Design. 

“It has been a long time since I have had the facilities and resources necessary to work on my large scale projects,” says Margot. “I am excited about combining typesetting with my other formal training to create new work at Wells. The enthusiasm of the students and the rich focus on the book arts is remarkable.  I am looking forward to seeing the work they produce.”

The Victor Hammer Fellowship was established in 1998 to honor Victor Hammer, a master craftsman in printing, bookbinding, calligraphy, typography, and punch cutting, who taught at Wells from 1939 to 1948. The two-year appointment consists of a residency at Wells and an apprenticeship at the Bixler Press and Letterfoundry in Skaneateles, NY. The purpose of the fellowship is to enhance the educational mission of the Wells Book Arts Center and increase awareness of the book arts as a field of study and practice, both at Wells and in the community at large. 

The Wells College Book Arts Center was established in 1993 to instruct in all areas of book arts and technologies. Students in book arts classes learn the history and philosophy of their craft as they develop hand skills in the fabrication of books. They gain international perspective on book arts with visits from accomplished lecturers, writers, and artists, and with field trips to the area's remarkable collection of libraries, presses, paper mills and binderies. Current classes teach design, typography, the evolution of letterforms, letterpress printing, bookbinding, and the history of the book.

For more information about the Wells College Book Arts Center and these new staff appointments, please contact Terrence Chouinard at 315/364-3420  or visit the Center’s website at aurora.wells.edu/~wbac/bookarts.

September, 2004

 


Wells College Announces Mildred Walker ’26 Visiting Fiction Writer for 2004-2005

Dorothy Allison, author of “Bastard Out Of Carolina,” to lecture

Dorothy AllisonWells College is proud to announce that award-winning feminist author Dorothy Allison is this year’s Mildred Walker '26 Visiting Fiction Writer. Allison will visit the Aurora campus on October 4 and 5. She will speak on “Changing the World, One Story At A Time” at 7:00 pm on Monday, October 4 in Barler Recital Hall. The entire community is cordially invited to hear this renowned author share her own story and view on life. The talk is free, and will be followed by a book signing. 

Southern novelist, activist, feminist, and self-proclaimed born-again Californian, Dorothy Allison grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, the first child of a fifteen-year-old unwed mother who dropped out of seventh grade to work as a waitress. 

A survivor of neglect, sexual abuse, and extreme poverty, she escaped South Carolina and went on to win a National Merit Scholarship to attend Florida Presbyterian College. Later she enrolled at The New School in New York City where she worked on a degree in Anthropology. 

Allison joined a radical feminist collective in the early 1970s, giving her a pseudo-religion which helped her to grapple with her family’s shocking mix of hate, beatings, rage, rape, and love. She did not try to see her family until 1981, when she chose to return to her roots. She admits that her first book, a work of poetry, The Women Who Hate Me, (1983) "wouldn't have happened if I hadn't gotten over my own prejudices, and started talking to my mother and sisters again."

Her second book, Trash (1988), a collection of short stories originally published by small lesbian presses and alternative magazines, won two Lambda Literary Awards. 

Allison received mainstream critical acclaim when her first novel, the semi-autobiographical Bastard Out of Carolina, was named one of five finalists for the 1992 National Book Award. It went on to win both the Ferro-Grumley Award for Lesbian Fiction and the Bay Area Book Reviewers Award for fiction, and was made into a Showtime movie produced by Angelica Huston. 

“Dorothy Allison has a voice that rivets,” says Ednie Kaeh Garrison, visiting professor of Women’s Studies at Wells. “You want to sit glued to your seat and soak in all the wisdom and pain and love and passion, but you find yourself unable to sit still. You want to jump and dance and cry and laugh. I imagine this must be what listening to those great orators who inspired revolutions was like. Allison makes revolution irresistible.”

The Wells College Book Arts Center is preparing a hand-printed keepsake which will be available for sale following the reading. All proceeds will benefit the Women’s Studies Department at Wells.

Dorothy Allison's visit to Wells is sponsored by the Women's Studies Department,  the Mildred Walker '26 Visiting Fiction Writer fund, the Dean of the College, the Diversity Series, the Women's Resource Center, the Wells College Library, Social Sciences Division, the Psychology Department, and the Intercultural Programs and Services Office.

For more information about Dorothy Allison’s lecture at Wells College, please contact Ednie Kaeh Garrison at 315/364-3272 or visit the college’s website at www.wells.edu. More information about Dorothy Allison may also be found at www.dorothyallison.net.

September, 2004

 


Wells Students, Faculty Present Group Poetry Reading

FootHills Publishing hosts five published Wells poets

Professor Bruce BennettThe Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to announce that several members of the Wells community will present a group poetry reading. Two current students, two alumnae, and one faculty member will read at 7:00 pm on Thursday, September 30 in the Chapel in Main Building. Each has had their work printed by FootHills Publishing. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the poets; refreshments will be served.

The featured poets are:

Rene Battelle ’03. Rene will be reading from her chapbook entitled Pieces: A Journal of Dreams and Poems, a collection of some of her dreams alongside poems that were inspired by those dreams. Rene is currently living and working in Syracuse, and is at work on a collection of poems about her neighborhood.

Angela Dockwiller ’03. Angela is the author of Springfed chapbook #35. She will appear to read a selection from Stories from the 72nd Street Home for the Irrevocably Lost and Forgotten Agents of Destruction, a collection of dramatic monologues from her senior thesis. 

Susan "Susannah" Loiselle. Susannah lives in Locke, the mother of five children. She is a non-traditional student at Wells and enjoys writing, English and Book Arts classes. Susannah writes about Central New York life and aspects of this area in particular. Her poetry has been published in the Wells Chronicle, Play of Mind, author J. Robert Lennon's online site "Dispatches," and in The Healing Muse. The title of her chapbook is God Speaks To Me at the Salvation Army Thrift Store.

Jill Parsons ’05. Jill, originally from Albany, is currently a senior at Wells College majoring in Creative Writing and minoring in the Book Arts. Her FootHills Springfed chapbook, The Edge of an Awakening, was published December 2002. She is editor of two magazines, the Wells Chronicle and Play of Mind, which publishes works by undergraduate writers in New York State. Currently, she is writing her senior thesis, a collection of poems based on newspaper stories. 

Bruce Bennett, Professor of English at Wells College. Bruce has had several books and chapbooks published by FootHills, most recently Hey Diddle, Diddle (2001) and Funny Signals (2003). His new FootHills chapbook, Grief and Love, has just been published and will be available at the reading. Bennett’s manuscript Web-Watching is the winner of Bright Hill Press’s 2003 Chapbook Competition. The national award was presented in June 2004. 

Host for the evening’s reading will be Michael Czarnecki, founder and editor of FootHills Publishing. Michael is a poet, small press publisher and oral memoirist who lives in the Finger Lakes region and occasionally on the coast of Maine. He spends his time writing, editing, publishing, hiking, and sitting and observing.

FootHills Publishing was formed in 1986 for the purpose of getting into print the words of poets who find it hard to get their work out to the public other than at readings or in the occasional magazine. Since its founding, FootHills Publishing has released more than 100 chapbooks. All of FootHills’ books are now hand-stitched, and the company has a reputation for fine quality content and production. More information about FootHills Publishing may be found at their website: www. foothillspublishing.com.

This poetry reading and the Wells College Visiting Writer Series are made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.  Poets and writers are invited to campus throughout the academic year to meet with students, present writing workshops, and read from their respective works.

For more information, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228 or visit the college’s website at www.wells.edu.

September, 2004

 


The Class of 2008

Wells College is pleased to welcome our new freshwomen to campus. These bright young women bring a variety of talents and smarts to the college
 

381 applications to the Class of 2008
88 students enrolled in the class
8 students related to alumnae
40 Henry Wells scholars
8 Girl Scouts
1 distinguished delegate at Rutgers’ Model United Nations Conference
84% performed community service inhigh school
68% held a leadership position in a school or community activity
1 self-employed owner of a general store
90% attended public school
10% attended private school
82% held jobs during high school
54 students played a sport in high school
1 recipient of a American Forum for Global Studies scholarship to Beijing University
770 highest verbal SAT score
670 highest math SAT score
1 student published in “Celebrate! Young Poets Speak Out” magazine
41 students involved with music in high school
31 students involved with drama in high school
1 Relay For Life volunteer

September, 2004

 


Wells College Welcomes Phi Beta Kappa Scholar

Dr. Stanley Engerman will speak on slavery in the United States

Dr. Stanley L. EngermanWells College welcomes Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar Stanley L. Engerman to the Aurora campus. On Thursday, September 23 at 7:30 pm in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall, Engerman will deliver an address entitled “Slavery and Its Aftermath in the United States.” The talk is free and the greater community is invited to hear this educator speak.

Dr. Stanley L. Engerman is the John H. Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History at the University of Rochester. He is past president of the Economic History Association, and an award-winning writer. Engerman co-wrote “Time On The Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery,” which was awarded the Bancroft Prize in American History. He is co-editor of The Cambridge Economic History of the United States and the forthcoming The Cambridge World History of Slavery.

Engerman received his B.S. and M.B.A. degrees from New York University, and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He joined the faculty at the University of Rochester in 1963, and was named John H. Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History in 1984. He was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Slavery and Abolition; Explorations in Economic History; and The Encyclopedia of World Trade Since 1450. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program makes available each year twelve or more distinguished scholars who visit 100 colleges and universities with Phi Beta Kappa chapters. They spend two days on each campus, meeting informally with students and faculty members, taking part in classroom discussions, and giving a public lecture to the entire academic community. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the intellectual life of the institution by making possible an exchange of ideas between the visiting scholars and the resident faculty and students.  Founded in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest national honor society. It has chapters at 270 colleges and universities, and over 500,000 members.

For more information about Stanley Engerman’s lecture at Wells College, please contact Professor Beatrice Farnsworth at 315/364-3239. More information about Phi Beta Kappa may be found on their website at www.pbk.org.

September, 2004

 


Foreign Languages Expert to Speak at Wells College

Dr. Virginia M. Scott of Vanderbilt University addresses students, faculty

Dr. Virginia M. ScottVanderbilt University comes to Wells College this fall. Dr. Virginia M. Scott, a leader in foreign language methodology and second language acquisition, will speak on Monday, September 27 at 4:30 pm in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. Her lecture, “From Foreign Language Education to the Trenches: Theories and Realities,” addresses second language acquisition theories and how they may or may not play themselves out in the classroom setting. The talk is free and all are invited to attend.

Dr. Virginia M. Scott is an associate professor of French and applied linguistics, and chair of the Department of French and Italian, at Vanderbilt University. Her childhood in France, Denmark, Madagascar, and Kenya set the stage for her interest in second language acquistion and foreign language pedagogy. Since her 1988 arrival at Vanderbilt, she has been director of the French language program, served as director of the Vanderbilt-in-France program four times, and twice been chair of the Department of French and Italian. She is currently on research leave for the 2004-05 academic year.

Scott earned a B.A. in French and education from Eckerd College, an M.A. in French with a minor in German from Florida State University, and a Ph.D. in French with a specialization in applied linguistics from Emory University. She is the author of numerous publications, including “Cloze Windows and Aesthetic Discoveries: Opening Visions for Teaching Literature” (forthcoming in The French Review, December 2004).

This lecture is sponsored by the Wells College Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Department, the Educational Studies Program, and the Dean of the College. For more information about Virginia Scott’s lecture at Wells College, please contact Professor Amy Staples at 315/364-3258.

September, 2004

 


Poetry Reading and Writing Workshop at Wells College

John Hoppenthaler will read from his work; meet with students

John HoppenthalerThe Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to welcome poet John Hoppenthaler to the Aurora campus. Hoppenthaler will read from his work at 7:30 pm on Wednesday, October 6 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker; refreshments will be served.

Mr. Hoppenthaler's poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Ploughshares, The Southern Review, New Letters, 5 AM, Tar River Poetry, The Bloomsbury Review, and Chelsea. He is the author of a book of poetry, Lives of Water, and serves as poetry editor of the journal Kestrel. He has recently taught creative writing at Manhattanville College, the West Virginia Writers' Workshop, and at the Chautauqua Institution in western New York.

Of Lives of Water, poet David St. John wrote: “There is such measured composure and quiet wisdom to the poems of John Hoppenthaler’s powerful debut collection... that their resonance and beauty stay with us long after their reading.” Lives of Water will be available for purchase in the college bookstore before the reading.

While on campus, Mr. Hoppenthaler will also participate in classes and conduct a poetry-writing workshop; a display of his work will be on exhibit in the Long Library.

Mr. Hoppenthaler’s reading and the Wells College Visiting Writer Series are made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.  Poets and writers are invited to campus throughout the academic year to meet with students, present writing workshops, and read from their respective works.

For more information about John Hoppenthaler and the Visiting Writers Series at Wells College, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228.

September, 2004

 


Wells College Introduces New Faculty Members

Eight new scholars arrive in Aurora to share their expertise with students

Wells College’s Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Hall is pleased to announce new full-time faculty appointments for the 2004-05 academic year:

Dr. Nadia Al-Bagdadi joins the Wells community as a visiting scholar this fall. She is a specialist in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies of the modern period, who has studied and taught both in the Middle East (Egypt and Lebanon) and Europe. Currently, she is Visiting Professor at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary where she teaches in the History Department and the Sociology and Social Anthropology Department. Dr. Al-Bagdadi's appointment at Wells is made possible thanks to the assistance of the Council for Independent Colleges (CIC) and Understanding Contemporary Islam (American University of Beirut).

Raul Delgado RodriguezRaúl Delgado-Rodriguez, visiting assistant professor of foreign languages, literatures and cultures, earned his B.A. from Brandeis University and M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University (comparative literature). His language fields are German, Russian, and Spanish; his specializations are in late 18th, 19th, and early 20th century literature. Professor Delgado-Rodriguez has taught at Hablespaña Language Institute, Bentley College, Harvard University, Universität Mannheim, and in the Brandeis Summer Program at Augsburg University.  Professor Delgado-Rodriquez will teach German and Spanish courses.

Deborah A. Gagnon, visiting assistant professor of psychology, received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from the University of Buffalo (SUNY). Her graduate work focused on cognitive (experimental) psychology, and her research interests include speech perception and spoken word recognition and spoken word production. She has taught at Temple University, Widener University, and the University of Buffalo. Professor Gagnon has been a technical consultant for the Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Her most recent position before coming to Wells was assistant director for programs and director, digital library and information technologies, in the Olin Library at Cornell University. 

Jill S.H. HillJill S.H. Hill has accepted a tenure track appointment in psychology. She earned her B.A. and M.A. from Loyola College in Maryland and is completing her Ph.D., which will be awarded by the University of Oklahoma. Her research interest is culturally competent approaches to psychological assessment with emphasis on personality assessment of American Indian adults. She has taught at San Diego State University, University of California at Irvine, University of Oklahoma, and Loyola College. Professor Hill's desire to serve typically under-served and marginalized populations and communities motivated her to pursue her studies in the counseling psychology field. 

Raymond Joseph Hoffmann is the college's Robert D. and Henrietta T. Campbell '12 Professor of Religion. Previously he was a visiting professor of religion at Wells. He earned his B.A. and M.A. from Florida State University, M.T.S. from Harvard University, Th.M. from the Harvard Divinity School, and D.Phil. from the University of Oxford. His areas of specialization are religions of late antiquity; early Christianity; early medieval studies; and interdisciplinary studies in history, literature, and religious thought. He has taught at the American University of Beirut, Westminster College (Oxford), and Africa University in Zimbabwe, among others. 

Ethel King-McKenzie, assistant professor of education (tenure track), earned her B.Ed. from the University of the West Indies (Jamaica) and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. She has taught at Ashland University and Louisiana State University in the areas of curriculum and instruction and theory. Other areas where she has received advanced training and has scholarly interests include social studies and qualitative research methods. Professor King-McKenzie's dissertation, Jamaican Women Educators: Two Life Histories, is grounded in ethnographic, autobiographic, multicultural, and oral history. 

Jeffrey Michael Rebudal, visiting assistant professor of dance, earned his B.A. from the University of Hawaii-Manoa and his M.A. from American University. He is a founding member of the critically acclaimed Seán Curran Company and has spent the last seven years performing around the world. He has taught at the University of Oklahoma, Connecticut College, Wesleyan University, New York University, University of Hawaii, and The American University. His teaching and performance areas include modern dance, ballet, street funk (hip-hop), Philippine and hula dance, and choreography. As a Filipino-American dance artist, Professor Rebudal's choreographic and scholarly work continues the exploration of the relationship between Filipino folk and postmodern dance movement while addressing Asian/Asian-American contemporary issues. Professor Rebudal will replace Jeanne Goddard who is on sabbatical for a year.

Jaclyn L. SchnurrJaclyn L. Schnurr, assistant professor of biology (tenure track), earned her B.S. from Cornell University and Ph.D. from Idaho State University (biology with a concentration in ecology). She has taught at Sheldon Jackson College (Alaska) and Idaho State University. Professor Schnurr was a post-doctoral associate at the Savannah River Ecology Lab and has received grants from the National Science Foundation, Bullitt Foundation, and Murdock Foundation, among others.



September, 2004

 


Wells College’s Library Adds New Technology

New JSTOR Connection Expands Campus Research Capabilities

The Louis Jefferson Long Library at Wells College has recently become a participating JSTOR library, giving members of the college community easy access to numerous core scholarly journals in a wide array of disciplines, many of which previously could not be accessed at Wells. Users now have access to over 107,000 digitized publications and nearly 16 million pages of information in a searchable database. 

“JSTOR widens our reach tremendously,” says head librarian Jeri Vargo. “Many students have already learned about it, and the faculty and staff members who are using it are very excited. JSTOR eliminates the need for time-consuming inter-library searches and loans. You can print the articles on your own computer if you want a hard copy. JSTOR also alleviates library storage issues.”

JSTOR is an acronym for Journal Storage. It helps libraries manage journal storage challenges and provides access to a range of scholarly resources well beyond most individual colleges’ budgetary means. The JSTOR database is unique because the complete archives of hundreds of scholarly journals have been digitized, starting with the very first issues, many of which date from the 1800s. New titles and fields are being added regularly, and issues are never “out.” They are always accessible and in pristine condition. The capacity for searching across disciplines opens up new possibilities for scholarship and research. 

JSTOR was originally conceived and funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and work began in the early 1990s when 750,000 journal pages were digitized and entered in a database. In 1995, JSTOR became an independent, not-for-profit organization. Today, college and universities across the country use its services. Its servers are located at Princeton University, the University of Michigan, and in Manchester, UK. 

The organization’s mission is “to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in information technology. Our initial focus is the creation and maintenance of a trusted digital archive of the full back run of academic journals. Through the development and maintenance of this searchable, interdisciplinary collection, our objective is to help all participants in the scholarly community… to be more productive, while simultaneously reducing system-wide costs and increasing convenience.” 

More information may be found online at www.JSTOR.org. Jeri says, “JSTOR offers a level of scholarly richness we have not previously experienced. Wells is most fortunate to have access to such a database.”

September, 2004

 


Wells Receives High Marks in U.S. News and Princeton Review College Rankings

Wells is one of only four New York State private colleges and universities named among the nation’s top liberal arts schools that offer quality education at an affordable price in the 2005 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges. 

“I am very pleased that U.S. News & World Report has again recognized Wells in their ‘Great Schools, Great Price’ list,” said Susan Sloan, Wells’ director of admissions. “We are very aware of the rising cost of higher education, and we believe there is a need for schools that offer quality but keep cost accessible to families. Our students today still benefit from Wells’ 30% tuition reduction policy of several years ago.” 

This year Wells is ranked #25 on the U.S. News list of the top 40 liberal arts colleges that offer the best value. The other New York schools named are Colgate (#8), Vassar (#23), and Hamilton (#28). 

Additionally, America’s Best Colleges ranks Wells in the 109th position in its “National Liberal Arts College” list. “We are implementing new academic program initiatives that are likely to move us up in the rankings,” said Sloan. “For now, we can celebrate being ranked in the vicinity of the top 100 liberal arts colleges. We’re competing with hundreds of schools, some with vast resources compared to ours, and we’re good and getting better.”

According to U.S. News & World Report, the formula used to determine the best value rankings relates a school’s academic quality to the net cost of attendance for a student who receives the average level of financial aid. 

The “Great Schools, Great Price” section contains two lists: “Liberal Arts Colleges” and “National Universities.” Six New York universities are named among the 50 schools ranked on the 2005 “National Universities” best value list, including Cornell (#17) and the University of Rochester (#32). Wells has affiliated academic programs with these two schools. 

Wells also scored national rankings in the 2005 edition of the Princeton Review’s The 357 Best Colleges.  Wells was named #15 in the nation for being best at encouraging class discussion and #20 on the list of most beautiful campuses.

The class discussion rankings are based on how much class time is devoted to discussion of course material compared to the amount of time a professor spends lecturing. “With our location on the shore of Cayuga Lake and our historic campus architecture, Wells is frequently cited as having a beautiful campus,” said Sloan. “It’s also important to note that our location in the Finger Lakes region provides unique opportunities for hands-on learning and research. We recommend that all prospective students make a campus visit to Wells.” 

Unlike U.S. News & World Report that relies on complicated statistical formulas to compute its annual rankings, the Princeton Review relies on surveys of college students to determine which schools offer the best in a wide variety of categories. More than 110,000 college students were surveyed to determine this year’s rankings, according to the Princeton Review.

Sloan said, “The U.S. is the world leader in higher education because of the amazing options students have. Somewhere in the nation there is a school that perfectly matches your life goals, learning style, and social preferences, a place that will enable you to succeed. The challenge for admissions professionals, students, and families is connecting the student with the school that is just the right fit. The Princeton Review’s college guide is a publication that helps make those connections because you can learn about outstanding programs at schools you might not necessarily encounter any other way, and the rankings are made from the perspectives of students who live and study at the schools.”

August, 2004

 


Wells College Welcomes New Associate Dean

Dr. Carolyn Denard joins administrative team; leads several student programs

Associate Dean Carolyn DenardWells College’s Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Hall is pleased to announce that Dr. Carolyn Coleman Denard joined the Wells community in mid-July as the new associate dean of the college. As associate dean, she is responsible for academic program planning and assessment, the first-year seminar, and experiential and service learning programs. 

Before coming to Wells, Denard was associate professor of English at Georgia State University (GSU) in Atlanta and currently serves as director of the Toni Morrison Society. In addition to her position in the English department, Carolyn was also a member of GSU's Women's Studies and African American Studies departments.

“It is a pleasure to welcome Carolyn Denard to Wells as Associate Dean of the College,” says Hall. “Her accomplishments, energy, and expertise are outstanding additions to the Wells College academic program and to the larger college community. Already we are enjoying the results of her can-do spirit, her readiness to understand Wells deeply, and her desire to join our efforts to assure that Wells students, faculty and staff thrive as we go forward.”

Denard has held many administrative leadership positions, including executive associate to the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction for the State of Georgia; executive board member of the National Council on Women; faculty associate on the University System of Georgia Board of Regents; and co-chair of Women's Studies at GSU.

She received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Emory University, her M.A.T. in English from Indiana University, and her B.A. in English from Jackson State University.  Her writing has been published in numerous journals and books.

Carolyn says, “I am delighted to join the administrative team at Wells. I have long wanted to be a part of a small liberal arts college, and I look forward to becoming involved in the college community and making important contributions to the academic program.”

For more information about Carolyn Denard’s appointment at Wells College, please contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260 or by email at gmcleod@wells.edu 

August, 2004

 


2004-2005 Wells College Arts & Lecture Series

Galumpha
Saturday, October 16, 2004
7:30 p.m.
Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall

GalumphaCombining stunning acrobatics, striking visual effects, physical comedy and inventive choreography, Galumpha brings to life a world of imagination, beauty, muscle, and merriment. Formerly known as the Second Hand Dance Company, the three performers have created a sensory feast of images ranging from the ridiculous to the sublime, drawn together into a seamless whole which consistently brings audiences to their feet. Galumpha is a triumphant mix of art and entertainment, offering world class, award winning choreography that is equally at home on the concert stage, at a comedy club, or at an outdoor festival.

 


“The Belle of Amherst”
Saturday, November 20, 2004
7:30 p.m.
Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall

The Belle of AmherstBased on the life and poems of Emily Dickinson, “The Belle of Amherst” is an inspiring biographical portrait of a famous and eccentric spinster who also happens to be one of America’s greatest literary figures. Written by William Luce and presented by Windwood Theatricals, “The Belle of Amherst” seamlessly weaves poetry and prose together in an entertaining and anecdotal revelation of Dickinson’s life and art, creating a portrait of the poet as a woman of deep sensitivity and lively intelligence with a wicked sense of humor.
 

 


Indiana University Soul Revue
Friday, February 25, 2005
7:30 p.m.
Sommer Center, Smith Hall

Indiana University Soul RevueHigh energy, impeccable musicianship, and sizzling soul - the IU Soul Revue delivers the sounds of timeless R&B, soul, funk, and contemporary urban black popular music. This performance will feature original compositions along with arrangements of works recorded by Stevie Wonder; Earth, Wind and Fire; Patti Labelle; Kelly Price; D’Angelo; Mary J. Blige; Eric Benet and more.

The Revue hails from Indiana University, and is a full ensemble featuring male and female lines, horns, and rhythm section. Directed by Tyron Cooper, the Revue has maintained its reputation as one of the finest collegiate popular music ensembles in America since 1971.

 


An Evening with Marcy McGinnis
Wednesday, May 4, 2005
7:00 p.m.
Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall

Marcy McGinnisMarcy McGinnis became Senior Vice President of CBS News in 2001. She oversees worldwide news-gathering, breaking news, hard news, and crisis coverage, as well as the operation of all national and international news bureaus. McGinnis was at the helm during coverage of 9/11 and the subsequent war in Afghanistan. She directed the coverage of the 2004 presidential campaign and election, and is the recipient of three Emmy Awards for CBS News’ coverage of the death of Princess Diana.

The title of McGinnis’ talk is “When Mama’s Happy, We’re ALL Happy: How Women Leaders are Changing a Man’s World,” to be followed by a question and answer period.

 


Tickets are available at the door the night of the performance, or from the box office the week preceding the show. 

Prices are $3 students/children, $6 seniors/ Wells, and $10 general admission. 

Please call the box office at 315/364-3456 to reserve tickets. For more information, call 315/364-3266 or check out the college’s website at www.wells.edu

August, 2004

 


Wells College Professor’s Book is Selected for Nationwide Publication

Bruce Bennett receives cash award, national distribution of manuscript

Wells College - Student Leadership ConferenceWells College Vice President for Academic Affairs Ellen Hall is pleased to announce that English professor Bruce Bennett is the winner of Bright Hill Press’s 2003 Chapbook Competition. The award was presented in June 2004.

Professor Bennett was honored for his manuscript Web-Watching, a collection of 24 poems which examines the ordinary phenomena of life while questioning the nature of design in the world. Bennett receives $300, publication, and national distribution of his book through several outlets including Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble. Release is scheduled for Spring 2005. Bennett is the author of seven books of poetry and sixteen chapbooks. Booklist cited his Navigating the Distances: Poems New and Selected as "one of the top ten poetry books of 1999." 

Bennett co-founded and served as an editor of Field: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics and Ploughshares, and has been an associate editor at State Street Press. His reviews of contemporary poetry have appeared in many magazines and journals, including The New York Times Book Review. Bennett teaches English and creative writing at Wells College, and directs the college’s Visiting Writers Series.

Bright Hill's programs may be seen on their web site: www.brighthillspress.org, and are made possible in part by the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information about Bruce Bennett and writing programs at Wells College, please contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315-364-3260 or  gmcleod@wells.edu, or visit the college’s website at www.wells.edu.

Two poems from Web-Watching  (in Adobe Acrobat format; requires Adobe Reader)

August, 2004

 


Orientation 2004 

Wells College has announced orientation program schedules for new students, transfers /W.I.L.L. students, and families. You can view the schedules individually in PDF format using the Adobe Acrobat reader:

New Student Orientation - Transfer/W.I.L.L. Orientation - Familiy Orientation

All three schedules are also available in HTML format as 

Orientation 2004

August, 2004

 


Wells Faculty Members Selected for Top College Awards

Annual teaching and advising honorees are announced 

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College Ellen Hall recently announced the recipients of Wells College’s annual teaching, advising, and student life awards. Given annually, the awards recognize excellence in each respective area. 

“All three awardees are outstanding members of the Wells College community and have served the college well in many ways,” said Dean Hall. “I am delighted to reward each of them in this way.”

Dean Hall heads the committee responsible for selecting the recipients each year. The committee is comprised of the Dean of the College, two former award recipients, two student leaders, and a college alumna employed by Wells. Students nominate their professors for the awards, and the committee chooses the final candidates.

Wells College - Student Leadership ConferenceThis year, Carol Shilepsky, professor of mathematics and computer science, received the college’s 2003-04 Award for Excellence in Teaching. Thirteen professors were nominated. 

Professor Shilepsky is described by her students as very creative, open-minded, and adaptable. “She makes her subject area engaging. Learning, as well as the learning process, is interesting and fun in her classes,” wrote one student. Professor Shilepsky was also praised for her use of the liberal arts philosophy and experiential approaches in teaching: “She encouraged me to take as many humanities courses as possible and to make connections to computer science in terms of real world problems,” wrote another student nominator. 

Being honored by the campus community for 30 years of service to Wells this year, Professor Shilepsky received her B.A. from Connecticut College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. She teaches Internet Architecture and Programming, Software Engineering, and Database Systems, among other courses. 

Professor of History Cynthia J. Koepp was chosen from among four faculty nominees to receive Wells’ 2003-04 Excellence in Advising Award. 

Students praised Professor Koepp for always being available and for her willingness to answer questions, her knowledge of college policies, and her encouragement of independent thinking. “Professor Koepp usually won’t tell you how to fix a problem, but she will guide you in the right direction so you can find the answer yourself,” wrote a student. Another reported, “This professor is an amazing asset to the advising field. I would recommend her to any student.” 

Professor Koepp received her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toledo and her Ph.D. from Cornell University. Classes she teaches include Introduction to the History of Science, Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe, Writing History, and Colonial Encounters. She joined the faculty in 1992 and was promoted to the rank of full professor this spring. 

Erika Feigenbaum, visiting instructor of philosophy, received the 2004 Student Life Award. Student government president Tazeem Pasha ’04 said, “This year, Cabinet opened up the nominations to the entire student body and received a great number in favor of the winner.”

In her nomination letter, a student praised Ms. Feigenbaum for “becoming an integral part of Wells in a short time, bringing a valuable depth of knowledge about social justice and inequality.” Other students highlighted the winner’s commitment to the importance of education. Students admired the recipient’s ability and desire to “teach us about and engage us in discussions about race, class, gender, and their intersection.” 

Ms. Feigenbaum earned her B.A. and M.A. at Cleveland State University and is completing her doctorate at The Union Institute and University of Cincinnati. She joined the faculty this year as a replacement for Professor of Philosophy Laura Purdy who is on leave. 

The awards were presented at the college’s 36th annual Honors Convocation celebration held in May. Students, faculty, and staff members who have excelled in academics, leadership, the arts, service, or on the athletic field are recognized at this event. In Wells’ early days, prizes and awards were given during May Day festivities and at Commencement ceremonies. As part of its centennial celebration, the college combined elements of both these events and held its first Honors Convocation in May 1968. Today the college presents 40 awards annually; 23 of them are endowed. 

For more information about Wells College’s faculty and student awards, please contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260 or by email at gmcleod@wells.edu

June, 2004

 


Life After Graduation 

What Three New Wells Graduates Are Up To

Eighty-nine Wells College seniors celebrated the end of undergraduate study during the 136th commencement ceremony held on Saturday, May 29. Among them are three extraordinary young women:

Economics and management major Judit Temesvary of Ithaca, New York. Judit, originally from Szentes, Hungary, moved to Ithaca in 2001 with her parents just so she could study at Wells. She completed her four-year degree in three years. “I was excited about the opportunity to take interesting economics and international studies courses, and always ended up with twenty credits each semester,” said Judit. “I also did a lot of internships for credit. I have had limited funding for my education, so graduating early was an obvious way to save money.”

While at Wells, Judit was awarded the Kauffmann Foundation grant to participate in an internship at the M&T Bank in Ithaca, working with numerous small business owners in the community. She also spent a month at the Bank of New York on Wall Street in New York City as an intern, and conducted internships at Cornell’s Applied Economics and Management Department, and with the Wells College International Studies Department.

Judit has accepted a full fellowship at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She will study economics with a concentration in international trade and political economy. After graduate school, she plans to become a researcher in the international arena, working for either a research university carrying out economic policy research, or for an international organization, working on economic development policy.

Psychology major Deborah Dhuy of Auburn, New York. While at Wells, Deborah served as the athletic office manager, a teaching assistant, and a residence assistance in her dorm. Between her junior and senior years, Deborah pursued an internship in New York City with Lucky Duck Productions. Her interests lie in film directing and producing, and this rewarding experience earned her film credits for two different projects. While interning in Manhattan, she was housed by a Wells alumna. She plans to continue her studies in this discipline at Boston University’s graduate program this fall. Deborah is a graduate of Auburn High School, also completed minors in theatre and creative writing at Wells, and was recently inducted into the national honor society Phi Beta Kappa.

Economics major Samantha Schenck of Baldwinsville, New York. During her time at Wells, Samantha served as the co-chair of the Women’s Resource Center and was a teaching assistant for two years, tutoring students for two different faculty members. Samantha has been accepted into the Ph.D. program at the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, where she will study alternative economic models. After finishing her terminal degree, she plans to teach economics at the college level. Samantha is a graduate of Homer Central School in Homer, New York.

June, 2004

 


Wells College Announces 2004 Alumnae Award Recipient

Former Aurora resident honored for her national fundraising expertise 

Patricia Parnie Purcell WahlenPatricia Callahan, president of the Wells College Alumnae Association, announced last week that Patricia Parnie Purcell Wahlen, Wells Class of 1966, is the college’s 2004 Alumnae Award recipient. Pat was honored on Saturday, June 12 during Wells’ annual Reunion Weekend for her unparalleled accomplishments as a fundraiser in education and the performing arts. Pat is currently a resident of Mentor-On-The-Lake, Ohio.

“Like so many Wells women before her, Pat Wahlen is a pioneer,” said Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson.  “She has led the way for women in the field of fundraising. When she first became a fundraiser, the field was dominated by men. Pat is one among a small group of extraordinary women who broke the glass ceiling as a nationally recognized fundraiser. Wherever her career has taken her, she has never forgotten Wells and Aurora. We are fortunate to have her guidance as a member of our board of trustees, and are proud of her success.”

Ms. Wahlen majored in philosophy at Wells. After receiving her bachelor’s degree, she pursued graduate studies in education at Boston University then returned to Aurora and worked briefly as a math teacher in Cayuga County. She joined Wells’ development staff as an administrative assistant in 1969, which was the start of her fundraising career. In 1976, after several promotions, she was named the college’s vice president for development. 

She then went on to hold development positions at Goucher College and the University of Maryland. In 1985, she became director of development and public relations with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and subsequently led a fundraising effort that raised $40 million for that organization. At the time, it was the largest campaign in the history of American orchestras; and her success created a sensation in the symphony world. 

In 1993, she was appointed director of development for the Cleveland Orchestra in Ohio, regarded by many as the nation’s top symphony. Ms. Wahlen raised $116 million for the orchestra’s Twenty-First Century Campaign, exceeding the original $100 million goal.  She raised a total of $195 million for the Cleveland Orchestra during her seven-year tenure. She was named one of Northern Ohio’s top ten most influential women in 1998 by Northern Ohio Live magazine. Since 2000, she has been a private fundraising consultant. 

Reflecting on her phenomenal success as a fundraiser, Ms. Wahlen said, “I see how things can be better, how things can become excellent - it’s that way in my development work and also in consulting. I can see the end; I can envision the goal. In campaigns, you often reach a point where everyone gets tired. I motivate people when their enthusiasm is slipping, even when I’m not feeling all that motivated myself. It takes vision and determination.”

Ms. Wahlen received the award and presented remarks during a ceremony held at Wells on Saturday, June 12, 2004, as part of the college’s annual Alumnae Reunion celebration. 

The Wells Alumnae Award was established in 1968, the year of the college’s centennial celebration, and is presented annually to one or two alumnae in recognition of their service to the college and their communities and/or their professional accomplishments. 

Previous Alumnae Award winners include Florence K. FitzPatrick ’25 (biologist, author); Mildred Walker Schemm ’26 (novelist); Jean Clark ’45 (environmentalist); Laura Nader ’52 (anthropologist, educator); Lillian Vitanza Ney ’60 (physician, cardiologist); Pleasant Thiele Rowland ’62 (entrepreneur); Kathryn Walker ’64 (actress, filmmaker); and Margaret Pericak-Vance ‘73 (geneticist). 

For more information about Pat Wahlen and the Alumnae Award at Wells College, please contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260 or by email at gmcleod@wells.edu.. 

June, 2004

 


Summer Student Leadership Conferences

Wells College - Student Leadership ConferenceThis summer, Wells will offer two Student Leadership Conferences for rising 12th grade girls. The sessions will be held on campus from June 28 - July 1, and July 5 - 8.

Conference workshops provide information and practice in areas important for leadership development. Workshops include problem solving, goal setting, public speaking, teamwork, and communication. In addition to the workshops, a ropes course, lakefront swimming, and evening activities will also be offered.

The summer sessions will be coordinated and led by Jeanine Birchenough, part-time student leadership coordinator. Jeanine is the former director of student activities at Wells. She recently completed her M.S. in Art Therapy at Nazareth College in Rochester.

The cost for the three-night, four-day experience is $175 and includes room, board, and conference fee. For more information, interested parties should contact Jeanine at 315/364-3441 or by email at jbirchenough@wells.edu.

June, 2004

 


Wells Political Science Professor Participates in Post-Apartheid South Africa Freedom Celebration and Conference

Professor Tukumbi Lumumba-KasangoThis year, South Africa is celebrating its first decade as an apartheid-free nation. Apartheid was legally and politically dismantled in 1994. To recognize this historic milestone, a week-long, international conference, South Africa: Ten Years of Freedom, was held in March in Pretoria. The meeting brought together more than 100 scholars and leaders from around the world at the invitation of the South African government. 

Wells College Professor of Political Science Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo was one of 40 scholars selected to present papers or to serve as chairs and discussants. He chaired and presented his views in the session on “Pan-African Perspectives on the Transition in South Africa.” 

The conference was organized by the Africa Institute of South Africa - a government research unit. “Our task was to provide critical perspectives and opinions to the South African government and people. They want to do a self-assessment of achievements since the end of apartheid, which will help leaders plan for the future,” said Professor Lumumba-Kasongo. “President Thabo Mbeki spent several hours with us, listening, and taking notes, taking time out from campaigning.” 

Professor Lumumba-Kasongo is especially interested in the relationship of South Africa to the rest of the continent and believes cooperation and unity among African countries will lead to an overall improvement of the lives of people in that part of the world. He applauds Mandela, Mbeki, and the African National Congress for their roles as peacemakers and their commitment to an African Renaissance. 

He said South Africa is a dynamic, democratic country with a strong economy; but it will have to re-define itself again. “Ethnic groups within the country must build relations with one another, and this has not yet happened. Since the end of apartheid in 1994, expectations have been very high. We need to remember it has only been ten years, and it might take 100 more to open the historical boundaries that have divided people. Liberal democracy is helping the process; however, what is really needed is education, especially with a good curriculum in the social sciences and the humanities as well as human-centered science and technology.”

As a member of the executive committee of the African Association of Political Science and Vice President for that organization representing the central region of Africa, he is vitally involved in shaping the discourse on educational thought and policy. He believes the idea of an African Renaissance must be infused in teaching so South Africa’s young people will learn more about the history and culture of African countries and people. 

Professor Tukumbi Lumumba-KasangoDuring the conference he saw a high level of optimism about the future among South Africans. This positive vision, cautioned Professor Lumumba-Kasongo, can only be realized by expanding economic opportunities in addition to improving education. 

While South Africa is rich in natural resources and has a strong agricultural base, about 35% of its citizens are unemployed. Among blacks, the rate of unemployment is 60% or more in some areas. “The market economy must be able to employ people, and they must have knowledge and skills in order to enter the job market.” 

At Wells, Professor Lumumba-Kasongo teaches World Politics, Comparative Environmental Policy Analysis, Approaches to International Relations, and Violence and Refugees, among other courses. He earned his B.A. with honors and Diplôme d’Agrégation from the Université Libre du Congo, his M.A. from Harvard University, and a second masters and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

A prolific author and popular speaker, his books include The Dynamics of Economic and Political Relations Between Africa and Foreign Powers, The Rise of Multipartyism and Democracy in the Global Context, and The Political Re-mapping of Africa. He is also a visiting research fellow at the Centre for the Study of International Cooperation in Education (CICE) at Hiroshima University, Japan.

Professor Lumumba-Kasongo believes higher education in the United States can contribute to greater equality in Africa and around the world through increased emphasis in the curriculum on global and international perspectives and a corresponding increase in related research. 

“In the U.S. we need to expand our global studies and international studies programs,” he said. “We cannot engage people in other nations when we do not know who they are. Through our system of education our citizens can learn about other cultures, global inter-connection, and the reality of the global economy. In the world today, no economy survives alone or in isolation. Education must reflect this condition.” 

June, 2004

 


Annual Senior Art Show Opens at Wells College

by Christina BrunThe Wells College Art Department presents the annual senior thesis art exhibit. The show opens on Monday, May 17 and runs through May 29 in the college’s String Room Gallery. Artwork produced by four graduating Studio Art majors will be shown. The exhibit is free and the public is cordially invited to view the show. An opening reception with refreshments on Monday, May 17 from 7:00-9:00 pm offers an opportunity to meet the student artists and view and discuss their work.

Four students will mount their senior thesis work: Christina Brun from Ballston Lake, NY (oil paintings); Sandra Jones from Lyons, NY (portrait paintings); Chinue Moore of Tempe, AZ (abstract paintings and sculpture); and Brea Roberts from Lockport, NY (figurative ceramic sculpture). 

Senior theses are the culminating requirement of study at Wells College. Art seniors are expected to plan and implement the entire exhibit, including the creation of the artwork to be shown, hanging the pieces and preparing the gallery, and coordinating the reception. Art professor and gallery director William Roberts guides the students’ work in the studios and oversees the installation of the show.

Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information about the exhibit and art classes at Wells, please contact William Roberts at 315/364-3237.

May, 2004

 


Pointes of Faith Dancers, Inc. 

Dance performance: The Awakening of the Inner Man

The Pointes of Faith Dancers, Inc. of Lyons, New York, present a repertory of modern dance and ballet choreographed by Rachael Platt. This spiritual performance is appropriate for all audiences, and for persons who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Persons who are partially sighted will be seated in the front.

The Awakening of the Inner Man will be danced at 7:00 pm in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall. General admission is $10. Seniors, students, and children are $8. Groups of 8 or more are $5 each. Advance tickets may be purchased by calling the Cayuga County Office of Tourism at 315/255-1658. Tickets will also be available at the door on the evening of the performance.

Pointes of Faith, Inc. is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Program, administered locally through the Finger Lakes Arts Grants and Services, Inc.

May, 2004

 


Driving Miss Daisy Motors onto the Wells College Campus 

A Mixed Company from Philadelphia stages this award-winning play

Driving Miss DaisyThe Wells College Arts and Lecture Series Committee is pleased to announce that Driving Miss Daisy is the theatre component of the 2003-04 series offerings. Produced and presented by A Mixed Company out of Philadelphia, the performance will take place on Saturday, May 8 at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium on the Aurora campus. Prices are $3 students/children, $6 seniors/Wells, and $10 general admission. Tickets may be purchased from the box office or the college bookstore the week preceding the show, or at the door the night of the performance. Please call 315/364-3456 to reserve tickets.

Set in Atlanta between 1948 and 1972, this Pulitzer Prize winning play by Alfred Uhry tells the story of an elderly Jewish matron (Daisy Werthan) and her black chauffeur (Hoke Coleburn), who is hired by Daisy’s upwardly mobile son (Boolie). At first, Daisy is none too happy about being forced to rely on a black man. But Hoke gradually wins her over, and the two slowly develop a deep-rooted affection for each other. 

Uhry does not address the issue of prejudice directly in Miss Daisy. It is through Hoke’s patient and often firm example that insight about social injustices is revealed. Uhry presents a fiercely independent woman, growing physically frail and increasingly forced to accept help, and a proud, hard working black man who needs a job. In the 25-year frame of the play, the changing world is reflected. A situation created from need becomes, with warmth, humor, and poignancy, a deep friendship rooted in caring. 

This three-character play gives a sometimes sentimental, sometimes bittersweet, always engaging view of life based on Uhry’s remembrances of growing up in the South. In 1989, Driving Miss Daisy was made into a motion picture starring Jessica Tandy, Morgan Freeman, and Dan Aykroyd.

The Wells College Arts and Lecture Series features professional guest artists and performers who are brought to campus to enrich the cultural and academic components of Wells as a learning community. The acts are selected annually by a committee comprised of Wells faculty, staff, administrators, and students.

For more information about Driving Miss Daisy and the Arts and Lecture Series at Wells, please contact associate dean for campus involvement Meagen Mulherin at 315/364-3428 or visit the college's website at www.wells.edu.

April, 2004

 


Wells College Announces 2004 Commencement Speaker 

Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations to address graduates 
on May 29

Wells College Commencement Speaker Catherine BertiniWells College President Lisa Marsh Ryerson is pleased to announce that Catherine Bertini, under-secretary-general for management of the United Nations, will be Wells’ 2004 Commencement speaker. The ceremony will take place on Saturday, May 29 on the Aurora campus. The Times of London Magazine has named her one of “The World’s Most Powerful Women.” Bertini is currently the senior American official in the United Nations Secretariat. Her primary responsibility is administering the United Nations’ human, financial, and physical resources. 

“I am thrilled the senior class has selected as their Commencement speaker a woman leader whose reputation goes far beyond the boundaries of the United States,” said Ryerson. “Cathy Bertini’s career reflects the value and necessity of women’s leadership in the global community. She has eased the suffering of millions of people whose lives have been touched by famine, war, and volatile political conditions. Wells is the ideal location to both honor her and share her wisdom.”

Under-Secretary-General Bertini earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from the State University of New York at Albany and has received honorary degrees from nine universities in four countries. In addition, she has taught at the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, was awarded the Prize of Excellence from the Association of African Journalists, and was a fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. 

Before assuming her current position, she served for a decade as executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) – the largest international humanitarian agency in existence. In 2001, under her direction, WFP provided food aid to 77 million people in 82 countries. 

Bertini is credited with assisting millions of victims of wars and natural disasters throughout Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and parts of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In particular, she has been widely praised for her efforts to end famine in North Korea, averting starvation in Afghanistan, ensuring the provision of food supplies during the crises in Bosnia and Kosovo, and preventing mass starvation that threatened 16 million people in the Horn of Africa due to a massive drought. She also visited the Mid-East, including Gaza and the West Bank, to assess humanitarian needs and assist in the planning process for the Road Map to Peace. 

Prior to joining WFP, Bertini served as United States Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Food and Consumer Services and as Acting Assistant Secretary of the Family Support Administration in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. 

For more information about Catherine Bertini’s commencement address at Wells College, please contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260 or by email at gmcleod@wells.edu.

April, 2004

 


Students Present Durang/Durang Comedies at Wells 

Senior thesis production mounted by performing arts majors

Wells College production of Durang/DurangWells College seniors will be mounting two Christopher Durang one-act comedies this spring. The senior thesis production will be performed in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on Saturday, May 1 at 7:30 pm and on Sunday, May 2 for a matinee performance at 2:00 pm. The show is free and open to the public.

Entitled Durang/Durang, senior Performing Arts majors Dana Finegan and Diana Gallego will be respectively directing and producing The Actor’s Nightmare and For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls. Both acts were written by Durang.  A cast of Wells students joins them, with production assistance by Wells technical director Joseph DeForest, visiting theatre professor Siouxsie Grady, and dance professor Jeannie Goddard. 

Playwright Christopher Durang was born in 1949 in Montclair, New Jersey. Educated at Harvard College and the Yale School of Drama, he has had plays both on and off Broadway including The Nature and Purpose of the Universe; Betty's Summer Vacation; Titanic; A History of the American Film; The Marriage of Bette and Boo; and his most popular, Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You. He won Obie Awards for Sister Mary Ignatius and The Marriage of Bette and Boo, received a Tony nomination for "Best Book of a Musical" for A History of the American Film, and received a Drama Desk nomination for Betty's Summer Vacation. 

The Actor’s Nightmare is a play about George Spelvin, a very confused accountant who wanders into a theatre during a dream and is immediately cast to replace Edwin Booth in that evening’s performance. He is joined by an A-list of historical theatrical figures including Henry Irving, Sarah Siddons, and Dame Ellen Terry.

For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls is a parody of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie. Spend an evening with Amanda, Tom, and Lawrence Wingvalley as they entertain a lady caller, Virginia Bennett. By the end of the evening, everything that could go wrong does, and we feel pity for the chronic hypochondriac Lawrence and his collection of glass cocktail stirrers.

Seniors Dana Finegan of New Oxford, Penn. and Diana Gallego of Roselle, New Jersey will direct and produce Durang/Durang as their thesis production. A thesis production is the capstone of an academic career in the performing arts at Wells, and is a requirement for graduation. 

Other Wells students involved in this effort include Angie Azevedo ’07 (Stage Manager), Kimberlee Clark ’07 (Ginny; Henry Irving/Executioner), Rachel Crosbie ’07 (Amanda Wingvalley), Tiffany Dever ‘06 (Crew), Marielle Gallagher ’07 (Lawrence Wingvalley), Johanna Gorton ’07 (Meg), Rachel Remby ’06 (Assistant Stage Manager), Hannah Salomon ’04 (Dame Ellen Terry), Laura Tennen ’07 (George Spelvin), and Kendal Turner ’04 (Tom Wingvalley; Sarah Siddons).

To learn more about Durang/Durang and the performing arts at Wells College, please call Dance Professor Jeanne Goddard at 315/364-3213

April, 2004

 


A Rockin’ Spring Weekend Planned at Wells College

“Spring Fever” rolls into Aurora

sunThe Wells College Programming Board is pleased to announce Spring Weekend 2004. Scheduled for Saturday, April 24, this rockin’ event is sure to please everyone, especially the college crowd. Spring Fever will take place on the Wells College campus on Route 90 in the village of Aurora. The general public gets in for $5 at the gate. Spring Fever is free for the Wells community.

The fun begins at 12:30 on the lawn in front of the Sommer Student Center. A three band line-up promises lots of awesome live music. VooDoo Blue of Baltimore fires it up at 1:00 with their distinctive alternative funk-rock style. At 2:20, groove to the ska/reggae/punk music of Coolie Ranx. Wrapping up a great day of live tunes, Antigone Rising, a hard driving “girl band” from the Big Apple, will rock the stage from 3:40 – 4:45 pm. A brilliant fireworks display will cap off Spring Fever at 9:00 pm.

General admission is $5.00 at the gate the day of the event. Special novelty activities include the “Adrenaline Rush” obstacle course, water wars, sand art, and bead jewelry making. The public is invited to bring a blanket or lawn chair and enjoy vendor booths, games, dancing, a barbeque, craft tables, and more. Beer, soft drinks, and food will be available for purchase. No recording devices, coolers or outside food or beverages permitted. 

Spring Fever will be held rain or shine. For more information, please contact the Office of Campus Involvement at 315/364-3428 or check out the college’s calendar of events at www.wells.edu/whatsnew/calendar.htm. Band information may be found on each of their websites: www.vdbmusic.com, www.coolieranx.net, and www.antigonerising.com.

April, 2004

 


Official Scribe to Queen Elizabeth II Lectures at Wells College 

Donald Jackson will speak on the creation of the hand-written Saint John’s Bible

Donald JacksonThe Wells College Book Arts Center is proud to announce that Donald Jackson will present the 19th Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 Memorial Book Arts Lecture at Wells College. The slide lecture will take place at 8:00 pm on Friday, April 30 in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on the Aurora campus. The public is cordially invited to attend this free lecture, entitled Walking in the Footsteps of Giants: The Creation Processes of The Saint John's Bible. A reception outside of Phipps will follow. The lecture is part of Matter and Spirit, the international book arts symposium taking place at Wells College April 29 - May 1. 

Jackson’s lecture will present a personal interim account of the images, inspirations, and processes involved in the creation of a handwritten and illuminated Bible. Commissioned in 1998 by the Benedictine Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minnesota, this monumental seven-volume work employs the talents of a team of artists, scribes, scrutchers, illuminators, illustrators, and schedulers. As the artistic director of the Saint John’s Bible, Jackson oversees the numerous aspects of this epic work at his scriptorium in Wales. His studio/workshop at the Calligraphy Center in Wales is the only calligraphy atelier in the United Kingdom where artist-calligraphers are still regularly employed as assistants maintaining the highest traditions of this ancient art in a modern context.

Donald Jackson is well known to calligraphers throughout the world as official Scribe to the Crown Office of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, in which capacity he executes Historic Royal documents including Letters Patent under The Great Seal and Royal Charters. He was decorated in 1984 by the Queen with the Medal of The Royal Victorian Order (MVO), which is awarded for personal services to the Sovereign.

Jackson is an elected Fellow and past chairman of the prestigious Society of Scribes and Illuminators, and past Master of the 600-year-old Guild of Scriveners of the city of London. His innovative work and inspirational teaching, together with books, a film series and exhibitions in Europe, North America, Puerto Rico, Australia and China have led to his being widely acknowledged as a seminal influence in Western calligraphy over the past 25 years. 

It was the first International Assembly of Lettering Artists seminar, inspired by Jackson, that brought him to Saint John’s University in 1981. Jackson returned several times over the years, and in the summer of 1996, served as one of the keynote speakers at Servi Textus: The Servants of the Text, a symposium that included a calligraphy exhibition featuring Jackson’s work.

Mr. Jackson’s lecture is part of a semi-annual series made possible through the Heiland-Garretson Book Arts Lecture Fund, established by Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 and sustained through the generosity of her family. Mr. Jackson’s lecture is part of the Wells Book Arts Center’s symposium entitled Matter and Spirit: The Genesis & Evolution of the Book, which will bring together presenters and attendants from around the world. Matter and Spirit will be held April 29 - May 1, 2004 on the Wells College campus. 

For registration materials and more information about this event, please contact the Wells Book Arts Center by phone at 315-364-3420 or by email at bookartscenter@wells.edu, or visit www.wells.edu/bookarts.

April, 2004

 


Wells College Students Selected to Present Research Findings at National Conference

Almost ten percent of the college's senior class will participate

Nine Wells College students have been invited to present the results of their original research at the 18th National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) to be held April 15-18 at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI). Students presenters, their research topics, and their faculty advisors are:

- Miranda Junge '04 (sociology major), "America's Misinterpretation of Migrant Farmworkers from Latin America," Professor of Sociology Leslie Miller-Bernal.

- Sarah Knowlton '04 (psychology major), "Female Sexual Dysfunction: Integrating Approaches to Treatment," Associate Professor of Psychology Vic Munoz.

- Kate Lankin '04 (biological and chemical sciences major), "Observing the Effect on Growth and Possible Caspase Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using the Monoterpene, D-Limonene," Assistant Professor of Biology Christina Wahl and Visiting Instructor of Biology Kathleen Arnink.

- Alice Lo '04 (religious studies major), "God in Global Justice: Understanding and Bridging the Gap Between Religious and Secular Activists in the Global Justice Movement," Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religion Ernie Olson.

- Karie Myers '04 (biological and chemical sciences major) "Dispersal Distance and Genetic Diversity in Three Species of Butterflies," Professor of Biology Thomas Vawter. 

- Caitlin Northrup '04 (environmental studies major), "The Effects of Farm Management on Soil Invertebrate Communities," Associate Professor of Environmental Studies Niamh O' Leary.

- Melissa Samons '04 (biological and chemical sciences major), "Cytotoxic
Effects of Azaspiracid on Human Lymphocyte Cells," Assistant Professor of Biology Christina Wahl.

- Eberle Schultz '04 (biological and chemical sciences), "Influence of Lobular Carcinoma In Situ on Recurrence of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma," Assistant Professor of Biology Christina Wahl.

- Judit Temesvary '05 (international studies major), "Trade Relations Between Europe and Africa: Dependency in North-South Economic Cooperation," Professor of Political Science Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasango.

This will be the 16th year Wells Professor of Chemistry Christopher has accompanied students to the conference. "This year's participants represent about 10% of the senior class," he said. "I doubt there are any other colleges or universities participating at the conference that can match this number."

Professor Bailey attributes Wells' success in this area to the large number of faculty members at the college who believe in and support undergraduate research. 

Wells students have extraordinary opportunities to work closely with their professors on original research. Most majors offer academic credit for research activities, and students are required to complete a senior creative or research project before graduation. 

This emphasis on research in the undergraduate curriculum at Wells, similar to graduate-level studies at other colleges and universities, gives students an advantage whether they plan to continue their studies or enter a career immediately after graduation.

This year NCUR participants come from over 300 colleges and universities representing almost every state in the nation. Since its inception in 1987, NCUR has become a major annual event drawing over 2,000 undergraduates, faculty, and administrators to hear and discuss undergraduate creative and scholarly work. 

In addition, NCUR presents an opportunity to hear nationally prominent speakers and for faculty to discuss educational policy, programs, and funding for undergraduate scholarly work. More information about NCUR may also be found at: www.NCUR.org.

April, 2004

 


Wells Science Colloquium Series Presents Student Research Findings

The For the remainder of the spring 2004 semester, the Wells College Science Colloquium Series will present the results of in-depth research conducted by students in various scientific disciplines. 

Presentations will be given at 12:30 p.m. in Zabriskie Hall on the Wells campus in Room 102. All these events are free and open to the public. Below are the dates when presentations will be made and their titles:

Wednesday, April 14: Michelle Husain ’04 (mathematical and physical sciences major) will present “Loudness and Dynamic Range in Cochlear Implant Listeners.”

Friday, April 16: Emelie Cuppernell ’04 will present “Wind Energy: A Site Evaluation” and Amanda Pingitore ’04 will present “Operations Research and Operation Iraqi Freedom.” Both are mathematical and physical sciences majors.

Friday, April 23: Karie Myers ’04 will present “Dispersal Distance and Genetic Diversity in Three Species of Butterflies” and Christina Taylor ’05 will present “Wolbachia-induced Speciation in the Wasp Genus Nasonia.” Both are biological and chemical sciences majors. 

Friday, April 30: Eberle Schultz ’04 (biological and chemical sciences) will present “The Effect of Lavendula angustifolia Essential Oil on Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.”

Friday, May 7: Sarah Valley ’04 will present “Understanding the Menstrual Cycle: Teaching Secondary Students How Eggs Become Fertile” and Kelly Langerfeld ’04 will present “The Effect of Light on Stromal Cell Density in Chick Embryo Corneas.” Both are biological and chemical sciences majors.

Friday, May 14: Kate Lankin ’04 will present “Observing the Effect on Growth and Possible Caspase Activitation in Saccharomyces cervisiae Using the Monoterpene, D-Limonene” and Kathleen Cornell ’04 will present “Wings of Evolution: A Biological Retrospective on Butterfly Evolutionary Research.” Both are biological and chemical sciences majors.

As this series of high-quality presentations reflects, Wells students have extraordinary opportunities to work closely with their professors on original scientific research. Majors in scientific fields offer academic credit for research work, and students are required to complete a senior research project before graduation.

Nine Wells students were selected this spring to present the results of their research efforts at the 18th National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) held at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis.

“I enjoy taking Wells students to the Annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research because it gives them a chance to compare themselves to their peers from other colleges and universities,” said Wells Professor of Chemistry Chris Bailey. “They find their research endeavors are more profound and more analytic than those of students from most other schools. With this contrast they come to realize their close interactions with faculty combined with the autonomy given them in performing their research are unique features of Wells.”

This emphasis on research in the undergraduate curriculum at Wells, similar to graduate-level studies at other colleges and universities, gives students an advantage if they plan to continue their studies or enter careers in scientific fields.

Two Wells faculty members organize the Science Colloquium Series: Niamh O’Leary, associate professor of environmental studies, and Carol Shilepsky, professor of mathematics and computer science. Other faculty members in the sciences contribute by inviting speakers and organizing the colloquia that focus on internships.

According to Professor O’Leary, this series brings scientists and speakers in a variety of science-related fields to campus. “These presentations keep students and faculty up-to-date with current scientific research and connected with the wider scientific community. It also serves as a venue for students to explore possible career paths and for Wells faculty to present their original research,” she says.

For more information about the Wells College Science Colloquium Series, visit <http://aurora.wells.edu/~science/> or call 315.364.3279. 

April, 2004

 


“Guerrilla Girls on Tour” Perform at Wells College 

An Activist Theatre Collective Since 2001 - Changing the World, One Sexist City at a Time

Guerrilla GirlsScampering across the stage, Guerrilla Girls On Tour will be on the Wells College campus April 14 and 15, 2004. The internationally acclaimed anonymous theatre collective will give a stage performance at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, April 14 in Barler Recital Hall. The troupe combines street theatre antics with art activism for an inspiring, intriguing show. The performance is free and the public is invited to attend.

Guerrilla Girls On Tour will bring to the Wells College campus a focus on the disenfranchisement experienced by women artists and artists of color.  While students are well trained in the technique and craft of their chosen art, they are not provided with the tools needed to critically examine and confront the sexism and racism they are bound to face in their future careers.  This cross-cultural, multi-disciplinary event will serve to educate the community about the current state of sexism while at the same time proving that feminists are funny.

Guerrilla Girls On Tour is a diverse company of theatre artists and comediennes. This signature performance - Guerrilla Girls On Tour Gig - is a 70-minute energetic romp through their herstory: an up-to-date account of their latest actions in politics, the performing arts, and the media. GGOT creates original plays, street actions, visual work, and residency programs that dramatize women’s history and advocate on behalf of women and artists of color.

Guerrilla GirlsIn order to put the focus of their work on the issues they address, each member works under the name of a deceased female artist and performs wearing a gorilla mask.  The 20-member troupe has toured 25 states and 5 countries, bringing their brand of satirical performance art and activism against discrimination, sexism and racism to places like the Republic of Georgia, Eastern Europe and South America. 

While at Wells College, GGOT will also conduct a master class and visit students in the classroom. 

Guerrilla Girls on Tour is proudly sponsored by the Women's Resource Center, LBQTA, the Collegiate Association, Women's Studies, Art History, Performing Arts, the dean of students, the dean of the college, the Office of Intercultural Programs, and Residential Life.

For more information about Guerrilla Girls on Tour and their performance at Wells College, please contact Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies Ednie Garrison at 315/364-3272. More information on GGOT may also be found on their website: www.guerrillagirlsontour.com.

April, 2004

 


Annual Spring Dance Concert at Wells College

“Dancing the Journey” features student and faculty choreography

Spring Dance Concert - Wells CollegeThe Wells College Performing Arts Department proudly presents Dancing the Journey, this spring’s student and faculty dance concert. The show will run Friday, April 16 and Saturday, April 17, beginning promptly at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall. Prices are $3 students/seniors, $5 Wells community, and $7 for the general public. Tickets are available from the box office the week preceding the show (call 315/364-3456) or at the door the night of the performance.

Dancing the Journey features a collection of unique choreographic works with a wide range of musical accompaniments. This year’s concert features original dance thesis work by graduating seniors Lindsay Connor and Margaret Irving, as well as new and repertory pieces by guest artist Elizabeth Wilmot-Bishop and Wells College faculty member Jeanne Goddard.  The twenty students of the Wells College Dance Ensemble will perform a varied program of ballet and modern dance choreography.

Lindsay Connor’s Reach, an abstract work, develops movement themes of reaching, rising, and falling into richly textured ensembles and solos. Connor’s work is formal in structure, built upon theme and variation and set to the adagio and rondo allegretto movements of Beethoven’s Waldstein piano sonata. Photographic Images is choreographed by Margaret Irving and set to an eclectic score by various contemporary musicians, including Ithaca artist and dj canGuru. The piece explores relationships, alienation and the struggle to define identity. Irving calls her work “an autobiography…a memoir…a photo...giving only so much information.” Memories are captured and revealed through a series of moving and still images.

Spring Dance Concert - Wells CollegeGuest artist Elizabeth Wilmot-Bishop contributes Les ailes de neige, a contemporary ballet blanc for eight women, evoking images of wind and snow, set to Schubert’s Impromptu no. 2 in E flat major. Wells dance professor Jeanne Goddard reprises Songs of Travel, a large-scale dramatic work to the Vaughn Williams song cycle of the same name, and premiers Vaccai, a series of studies based on traditional vocal exercises and culminating in a lush septet set to Lascia ch’io pianga from Handel’s Rinaldo.

For more information about Dancing The Journey and dance classes at Wells, please contact dance professor and director Jeanne Goddard at 315/364-3213. 

April, 2004

 


Wells College Faculty Present Flute and Piano Recital

The Music Department at Wells College is pleased to offer an evening of flute and piano music. On Saturday, April 10, music lecturers Nancy Gilbertson and Laura Campbell will present a free concert at 8:00 pm in Barler Recital Hall. The public is cordially invited to attend. A reception with the musicians will follow the recital.

The evening's program includes the Poulenc Flute Sonata, Bartok’s Dances in Bulgarian Rhythms, and Suite Antique by John Ritter. Also on the program will be a piece entitled Three Chants for flute solo by Ann Silsbee. Ms. Silsbee was a composer, poet, and artist who lived in Ithaca for many years. She passed away in August 2003. Campbell worked with Silsbee on several projects and dedicates this performance in her memory. 

Nancy Gilbertson has taught music at Wells College since 1987. She received her bachelor's and master's degrees in piano performance from Kent State University in Ohio. She has been a dedicated private piano teacher since 1973, and an active soloist and accompanist in central New York since moving to Moravia in 1986. Nancy released her first recording, Mediterranean Magic, in 2000. 

Laura Campbell is instructor of chamber music at Wells College and instructor of flute at Colgate University, where she is also the principal flutist of the Colgate Symphony. She completed her B.M. in Music Performance and Education from Southern Illinois University and her M.S. in Music Education from the University of Illinois. Her recording of Margaret Fairlie-Kennedy's “Windrider/Final Ascent” is available on the CD Evocations from Capstone Records, Society of Composers, Inc. and she has recently released a CD of flute and harp music with harpist Myra Kovary entitled Morning Light.

For more information about the performance, please contact Nancy Gilbertson at 315/364-3343.

April, 2004

 


Wells Seniors Present Research Findings on the Environment and Biology in the College’s Science Colloquium Series

Wells College students Caitlin Northrup and Sarahjane Locke will present the results of their senior research projects in the college’s Science Colloquium Series on Friday, April 9. The presentations will begin at 12:30 p.m. in Zabriskie Hall, Room 102, on the Wells campus in Aurora. The event is free and open to the public.

An environmental studies major, Northrup will present her research on “The Effects of Soil Management on Soil Invertebrate Communities.” Locke’s research presentation is entitled, “Possible functions for Btn2p and Ist2p in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model for Batten disease.” She is a biological and chemical sciences major. 

The Wells Science Colloquium Series is organized by two Wells faculty members: Niamh O’Leary, associate professor of environmental studies, and Carol Shilepsky, professor of mathematics and computer science. Other faculty members in the sciences contribute by inviting speakers and organizing the colloquia that focus on internships.

According to Professor O’Leary, this series brings scientists and speakers in a variety of science-related fields to campus. “These presentations keep students and faculty up-to-date with current scientific research and connected with the wider scientific community. It also serves as a venue for students to explore possible career paths and for Wells faculty to present their original research,” she says.

For more information about the Wells College Science Colloquium Series, visit <http://aurora.wells.edu/~science/> or call 315.364.3279. 

April, 2004

 


Educational Talk on Transgender Issues at Wells College 

Jamison Green to meet with students, discuss gender topics

Jamison James GreenWells College welcomes consultant, speaker, panelist, and author Jamison "James" Green to the Aurora campus. Green will address the public on two occasions while at Wells. On Thursday, April 8 at 7:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room, Green will read from his new book Becoming a Visible Man and talk about female-to-male transsexual history and politics. Refreshments will follow.

The second gathering will be an informal chat on “Transgender and Gender Issues.” This talk will take place at 12:00 Noon on Friday, April 9 in the same location. Both lectures are free and open to the public.

Jamison Green is an internationally known leader within the transgender movement. He has appeared in eight documentary films, and is the recipient of numerous awards given by national transgender organizations. James has been delivering educational presentations about transsexual and transgender issues and experience since 1989. His talks appeal to transsexuals and non-transsexuals alike.

Mr. Green is known as an advocate for the legal protection, medical access, safety, civil rights and dignity of trans people. He has published several essays and articles, and writes a monthly column for PlanetOut.com. Becoming A Visible Man will be published in late spring 2004. 

This program is part of the Transgender Speaker Series coordinated by Professor of Psychology Vic Muñoz in collaboration with the Wells Student Diversity Committee and the Office of Intercultural Programs and Services. The purpose of the series is to raise awareness and educate about transgender issues.

To learn more about Jamison's talk, please call Professor Muñoz at 315/364-3248.  Additional information about Jamison may also be found on: www.jamisongreen.com

April, 2004

 


The reading has had to be postponed; please watch this page for information on rescheduling. 

Poetry Reading and Writing Workshop at Wells College 

John Hoppenthaler will read from his work; meet with students

John HoppenthalerThe Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to welcome poet John Hoppenthaler to the Aurora campus. Hoppenthaler will read from his work at 7:30 pm on Monday, April 5 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. All are invited to hear this inspiring author. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker; refreshments will be served.

Mr. Hoppenthaler's poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Ploughshares, The Southern Review, New Letters, 5 AM, Tar River Poetry, The Bloomsbury Review, and Chelsea. He is the author of a book of poetry, Lives of Water, and serves as poetry editor of the journal Kestrel. He has recently taught creative writing at Manhattanville College, the West Virginia Writers' Workshop, and at the Chautauqua Institution in western New York.

Of Lives of Water, poet David St. John wrote: “There is such measured composure and quiet wisdom to the poems of John Hoppenthaler’s powerful debut collection... that their resonance and beauty stay with us long after their reading.”

While on campus, Mr. Hoppenthaler will also participate in classes and conduct a poetry-writing workshop. 

Mr. Hoppenthaler’s reading and the Wells College Visiting Writer Series are made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.  Poets and writers are invited to campus throughout the academic year to meet with students, present writing workshops, and read from their respective works.

For more information about John Hoppenthaler and the Visiting Writers Series at Wells College, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228.
March, 2004

 


Former Rhodes Scholar Speaks on Indian Nature Conservation Policies

Dr. Mahesh Rangarajan discusses India’s choices

Dr. Mahesh RangarajanThe public is cordially invited to attend a public lecture by Dr. Mahesh Rangarajan. He will speak on nature conservation policies in India on Tuesday, April 6 at 12:30 pm in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public.

India, the world's largest democracy, is a country with over one billion people. They share living space with the last lions in Asia, the largest concentrations of the tiger and the Asian elephant, and a host of other endangered landscapes, species and ecosystems. Conservation entails difficult choices and conflicts between human livelihood and habitat protection, and between economic growth and animal protection. A colonial past and the promise of a new future weigh heavily on present day choices. A host of new movements and initiatives raise hopes that there will be ways to harmonize India’s economic surge with nature conservation. The outcomes of these efforts will have implications well beyond India's borders.

Mahesh Rangarajan is a well-known historian of ecological change and a frequent television commentator on Indian politics. He is currently a consulting political analyst for “The Telegraph” and a visiting assistant professor at Cornell University. He has been a Fellow of the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, and was a Rhodes Scholar between 1986 and 1989. Dr. Rangarajan has published several books on the history and politics of wildlife conservation, with a focus on India. He speaks regularly on a variety of topics including environmental history, environmental activism, and historical as well as contemporary aspects of the relationship between ecology and politics. 

Dr. Rangarajan’s lecture is sponsored by the Environmental Studies and International Studies majors. For more information, please contact professor Niamh O’Leary at 315/364-3279.
March, 2004

 


Nancy Willard to Give Public Reading and Workshop

Visiting Writer will read from her work

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to welcome poet, fiction writer, essayist, and children’s author Nancy Willard to the Aurora campus. Willard will give a public reading of her fiction at 7:30 pm on Wednesday, March 31 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall. Ms. Willard is this year’s Mildred Walker Visiting Fiction Writer. All are invited to hear this inspiring author. The free reading will be followed by a reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker.

Nancy Willard is the author of two novels, “Sister Water” and “Things Invisible to See,” as well as many poetry collections, essays, and children's books. She received a Newberry Medal for “A Visit to William Blake's Inn.” “Things Invisible To See” has been called “a miraculous novel of 
enduring power by one of our finest talents.” Writing about “Sister Water,” one critic referred to “Willard's gift for seamlessly mixing the magical and the mundane.” Another critic wrote: “Her prose is at once fluid and beautiful… creates an atmosphere that is simultaneously haunting and comforting.”

Nancy Willard has for many years been a Writer in Residence at Vassar College.

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers are invited to campus each academic year. 

For more information about Nancy Willard and the Visiting Writers Series at Wells College, please contact English professor Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228.

March, 2004

 


Recycling for Earth Day

In observance of Earth Day and Arbor Day, the Campus Greens welcome all students to step up their efforts to recycle and be more environmentally friendly.

  • What: Week-long recycling effort
  • When: Week of April 22-29, 2004
  • How: Members of the Campus Greens will pick up recycled materials from the dorms daily. Recyclables will be weighed and a winner announced on Arbor Day (Friday, April 30). Prizes will be awarded in the dining hall during lunch hour.
  • Why: To increase awareness about recycling and move the Wells community to action

The goal of the Campus Greens is to increase environmental awareness on campus. The group is not politically affiliated.

For more information, please contact Jennie Cole ’06..

March, 2004

 


Wells College Republicans Bring Congressman Jim Walsh to Aurora

25th District rep will speak on the 2004 presidential election

Congressman Jim WalshThe Wells College Republicans are most pleased to welcome Congressman Jim Walsh to campus on Monday, March 15. Congressman Walsh will be speaking in the Main Chapel at 7:00 pm on “National Issues in the 2004 Election.” Mr. Walsh will give a brief overview, then will open the floor for a question-and-answer session. The entire program should last about one hour, and is free and open to the public.

Jim Walsh of the 25th Congressional District represents New York State in the House of Representatives as a member of the Committee on Appropriations. He is one of 13 chairmen of the Appropriations Subcommittee, a group sometimes referred to in Washington as "the college of cardinals" because of their influence on national spending policies. In the 108th Congress, Mr. Walsh is chairman of the Subcommittee on the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development. His district includes Onondaga County, northern Cayuga County, Wayne County, and the northeastern portion of Monroe County.

Mr. Walsh’s visit to the Wells College campus is sponsored by the College Republicans. The mission of the Wells College Republicans is to make known and promote the principles of the Republican Party among members of the Wells campus and community, and to develop political skills and leadership abilities among its members as preparation for future service by them to the Party, community, and country.

To learn more about Congressman Walsh’s lecture, please call director of communications Gwen Webber-McLeod at 315/364-3260.
March, 2004

 


Wells College Amnesty International Features Speaker

Francis Bok of the American Anti-Slavery Group talks about his own captivity 

Amnesty International at Wells College welcomes Francis Bok to the Aurora campus on Tuesday, March 16, 2004. While at Wells, Mr. Bok will give a public lecture on “21st Century Slavery: Living Proof” beginning at 7:00 pm in the Chapel, Main Building. The talk is free and open to the public; donations to the American Anti-Slavery Group will be gratefully accepted. A reception with the speaker and a book signing will follow the presentation.

Francis BokFrancis Bok is a 24-year-old native of Southern Sudan. At the age of seven, he was captured and enslaved during an Arab militia raid on the village of Nymlal in 1986. During his captivity, Francis saw adults and children brutalized and killed. After escape and arrest, the United Nations in 1999 resettled him in North Dakota. He now lives in Massachusetts and is an associate at the American Anti-Slavery Group of Boston.

Mr. Bok is the author of Escape From Slavery: The True Story of My Ten Years in Captivity and My Journey to Freedom in America. The Books for a Better Life Awards this week named Escape from Slavery as 2003’s most inspiring and empowering book by a new author. The New York City Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society hosts the Books for a Better Life Awards annually. Escape from Slavery was chosen from a pool of five nominees competing for the 2003 Suze Orman First Book Award. This book will be available for sale and signing after the lecture. 

In addition to his book, Mr. Bok has spoken alongside Coretta Scott King, testified before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, met with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and President Bush, and headed a panel on slavery at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government ARCO Forum. While in central New York, he will also speak at Cornell’s Warren Hall on Monday, March 15 at 5:00 pm.

Mr. Bok’s visit to the Wells College campus is sponsored by Amnesty International; the Wells College library; the Dean of Students; the Office of Intercultural Programs;     Collegiate; the divisions of Humanities and Social Sciences; and the departments of History, Religious Studies, International Studies, Foreign Languages and Literatures, and Spanish.

To learn more about Francis Bok and his lecture, please call Amnesty International advisor Laura McClusky at 315/364-3252.
March, 2004

 


“Got Passion?” Wells College Does!

Third annual Activism in the Academy symposium is student-driven 

Medea BenjaminWells College's third annual symposium on Activism in the Academy is planned for Friday, March 12 from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm at various locations across campus. The theme for this year’s event is "Got Passion?" The symposium focuses on the ways people in academia and on college campuses find and express their passion to change the world. The day-long event is free, and the public is cordially invited to participate in this engaging series of workshops and lectures.

Kick-off keynote speaker is activist, economist, and author Medea Benjamin of San Francisco.  Her motivating talk will be given at 9:00 am in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on the Aurora campus. Following the keynote address, participants will disburse to the workshop location of their choice. There will be two morning sessions, a lunch session, and one afternoon session. This appearance marks the beginning of Medea’s East Coast tour.

Benjamin is co-founder of Global Exchange, an international human rights organization dedicated to promoting environmental, political and social justice (www.globalexchange.org). She also co-founded Code Pink, a women’s anti-war movement. Medea is the author of several books that have given voice to Latin American activists, including Brazilian senator Benedita de Silva. She has made several trips to Afghanistan and Iraq to investigate the humanitarian situation among the refugees, to assess the consequences of U.S. bombing, and to hear from Afghan women’s groups.

Before co-founding Global Exchange with husband Kevin Danaher in 1988, she worked for ten years as an economist and nutritionist in Latin America and Africa for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Division, the World Health Organization, the Swedish International Development Agency, and the Institute for Food and Development Policy. She also ran for U.S. Senate, mobilizing thousands of Californians around issues such as the living wage, schools not prisons, and universal healthcare. 

Medea BenjaminThe symposium consists of a series of presentations, lectures, and workshops presented by regional activists and Wells College faculty, staff and students. Sessions explore a wide array of topics, from the very local to the very global, with such titles as: “Saving the Planet: What you can do and why it will work,” “How to Steal the 2004 Election: College Students and Grassroots Campaigning Strategies,” and “Student Action: Community Involvement at Home and Abroad.”

A 12:30 lunch session will feature invited guest Bo Lipari. A professional software engineer, he will speak on “Electronic Voting Machines: Understanding the Problems.” His talk refers to the vote counting discrepancies and other tribulations encountered during the 2000 Gore vs. Bush presidential election. He will discuss the resulting panic over voting procedures, the perceived need for reform, and the technology available now for electronic voting.

Afternoon workshop sessions will wrap up around 4:00 pm.

Started by the Collegiate Association (student government) in 2002, the purpose of the student-centered symposium is to promote civic engagement, encourage critical thinking, and find links between the academy and the world at large. One objective of the day is to empower Wells and local community members to use the college as a resource for advancing social justice and community development through interdisciplinary study. As a liberal arts institution, Wells College recognizes the value of service and activism as part of the learning process.

Faculty advisor and key coordinator Laura McClusky is excited about the symposium. “We are anticipating a great day of discussing the many ways academia is really about passion, not just sterile intellectual thought,” she says. “The students have done a remarkable job organizing this opportunity for the community to learn more about how each of us can work responsibly to change the world.”

To learn more about “Got Passion,” please contact assistant sociology professor Laura McClusky at 315/364-3252.

February, 2004

 


Wells College Joins with Public Leadership Education Network to Celebrate PLEN’s 25th Anniversary

PLEN honors three co-founders, former Wells president among them 

The Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) will celebrate its 25th anniversary on Thursday evening, February 26th at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.  The organization will honor PLEN’s three co-founders:

    • Frances Tarlton “Sissy” Farenthold, former Wells College president, founded the National Women’s Political Caucus and was nominated for vice president of the United States at the 1972 Democratic National Convention.

 

       
    • Ruth B. Mandel is currently director of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University and board vice chair of the National Holocaust Museum.

 

     
  • Betsey Wright is former executive director of the National Women’s Educational Fund, served as chief of staff to Bill Clinton when he was governor of Arkansas, and was deputy chair of the Clinton/Gore campaign in 1992. 

Carole Simpson, senior correspondent for ABC News, will serve as Master of Ceremonies for the gala. Current Wells College president and PLEN board chair Lisa Marsh Ryerson will talk about PLEN’s history and the contributions of its founders. 

Frances Tarlton Sissy FarentholdPLEN was established in 1978 at Wells by Sissy Farenthold. Farenthold wanted the nation’s women’s colleges to have an increased role in preparing their students to assume leadership roles. She envisioned a national consortium of women’s colleges that would offer educational programs, including seminars and internships. To achieve this goal, she turned to her friends and colleagues Ruth Mandel and Betsey Wright. Together they secured funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to launch the organization.

PLEN originally consisted of five women's colleges: Wells, Carlow, Goucher, Stephens, and Spelman. Today, membership includes 15 women’s colleges and two associate member colleges; PLEN established its Washington, D.C. headquarters in 1989. 

For the last quarter century, PLEN has prepared women college students from across the country for leadership by offering educational opportunities where their mentors are women leaders in Congress, courts, executive agencies, and advocacy groups in the United States as well as women engaged in shaping policy around the world. 

Present at the ceremony will be presidents, faculty, students, alumnae and staff from PLEN colleges along with women leaders who have served as mentors for PLEN students. Wells College senior and Collegiate President Tazeem Pasha participated in PLEN last year. She will attend the gala and will make brief remarks about her PLEN experience studying at the London School of Economics and Political Science and holding an internship in the British Parliament.

For more information about PLEN and Wells College, please contact Director of Communications Gwen Webber-McLeod at 315/364-3260. 

February, 2004

 


Wells College Offers Lecture on “Black Women in Contemporary Cultures”

Professor Kanaté Dahouda of Hobart & William Smith Colleges to speak 

Kanate DahoudaWells College welcomes Dr. Kanaté Dahouda to the Aurora campus on March 3 and 4, 2004. While at Wells, he will give a public lecture on “Black Women in Contemporary Cultures” on Wednesday evening, March 3 at 7:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room. The reading is free and open to the public. A reception with the speaker will follow the presentation.

Originally from the Ivory Coast, Dr. Dahouda is now an assistant professor of modern languages at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York.  His field of teaching encompasses Francophone literature, cultures, and societies (Quebec, the Antilles, and Africa). His principal research interests include exile, migrancy and quest for identity, and the memory of violence as well as the writing of subversion in contemporary Francophone literature. His current research and this public lecture are relevant to the representations of black women in the media, literature, and films from Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. 

Dr. Dahouda received his Ph.D. from Laval University in Quebec, and his M.A. and B.A. degrees from the Université Nationale de Côte d’Ivoire. Prior to coming to central New York, he taught French and the problematics of “la Francophonie” at Language Studies Canada in Montreal. 

While on the Wells campus, Dr. Dahouda will attend a screening of “The Life and Times of Sara Baartman: The Hottentot Venus" (1998, dir. Zola Maseko). He will also meet students for an informal discussion of the current political situation in the Ivory Coast and will give an informal presentation on "negritude," identity, and Aimé Césaire. Additionally, he will comment on two poems by Leopold Sédar Senghor and René Dépestre during a poetry presentation which will be given in French. 

Dr. Dahouda’s visit to the Wells College campus is sponsored by the Office of Intercultural Programs; the Office of the Dean of the College; the Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures department; the Office of Campus Involvement; International Studies; Women’s Studies; and the Sociology and Anthropology majors. The reception is sponsored by the following student groups: P.O.W.E.R., the Wells International Students Association, and the Women’s Resource Center.

To learn more about Kanaté Dahouda and his lecture, please call assistant professor of French Amy Staples t 315/364-3258.

February, 2004

 


Wells Students Gather in Albany to Lobby for Restoration of Higher Education Funding

Wells students lobby in AlbanyOn February 10, more than 800 students representing New York’s private colleges and universities converged on Albany to lobby against proposed cuts in student aid and to educate both legislators and the public about budget issues facing the state’s private higher education sector.

A record number of Wells students attended this year’s event: Tazeem Pasha ’04, student government president; Eberle Schultz ’04, student government vice president; Alexis Boyce ’04, Community Court chair; Cindy Cicarell ’06; student government treasurer; Meghan Hawley ’06, student government corresponding secretary; and Carrie Elliott ’05, representing Wells’ student newspaper. The students were accompanied by Gwendolyn Webber-McLeod, Wells’ director of communications. 

“Having so many Wells women attend this year’s Lobby Day had a two-fold benefit,” said Webber-McLeod. “Ninety-one percent of our students receive some form of financial aid, and 51% receive funds from the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), which is facing reduction by a third. This is an issue that touches their lives directly. Also, it’s important for young people to understand how government works and that by being articulate and expressing their views they can have an impact.” 

In addition to serving as an opportunity for students to make their case with elected officials, Lobby Day, organized by New York’s Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities (CICU), was a time for educating those involved about key political issues and encouraging active participation in the democratic process. Information sessions were offered for students, public relations professionals, financial aid administrators, parents, and alumni, among others.

According to Webber-McLeod none of the Wells students had visited Albany previously and few had any experience with lobbying. She prepared them by putting together an information packet and teaching them effective lobbying strategies “They were excited, engaged, and looked very professional,” she said. 

The Wells women met with Assemblyman Gary Finch and Senator Michael Nozzolio. “Typically when there is a major lobbying day in Albany, state representatives run on a tight schedule and have limited time to meet with groups. In our case, they were so engaged with what the Wells students had to say they spent additional time with us, which was positive for all. The students were smart, articulate representatives for the issues and for Wells,” said Webber-McLeod.

The experience had an added benefit for Alexis Boyce who said, “The trip did a lot to boost my self confidence. I'm a very low-key person, and I was pleased to discover I can hold my own in such a professional environment.” Eberle Schultz came away from the meetings feeling positive about her efforts: “I think it was an easy sell. No one wants to cut funding that helps students attend the school of their choice. Unfortunately, TAP has become a pawn in the political game, but I will be very surprised if the cuts are 
passed.”

Meghan Hawley spoke passionately about the need for young people to be more involved in the political process. She said, “I do not believe in apathy. Young people need to be educated about how they can make their voices heard on issues that matter most to them. By being in active in politics myself, I can ensure that my generation's needs will not be stifled and speak for those who remain silent.”

Central to the lobbying efforts are the restoration of many programs that have been targeted for cuts or have already been eroded. According to information provided by CICU, legislators are being urged to restore cuts and proposed cuts in TAP, Bundy Aid, the Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP), the Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (C-STEP), and Liberty Partnerships. 

Advocates called for increased funding of the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), which offers economically disadvantaged and under-prepared students counseling, tutoring, and supplemental financial assistance. They also requested restoration of direct institutional aid to colleges and universities that helps defray increasing institutional expenditures for students.

Meghan Hawley viewed the lobbying effort as a resounding success: “Wells women articulated the need for financial assistance and proved to the legislators the programs are successful. No politician can deny the importance of education, and we made it clear higher education funding needs to be a priority.  These budget cuts have been proposed for the past three years, but thanks to students' lobbying, New York State continues to make quality education affordable.”

Webber-McLeod said, “Lobby Day is another great example of the Wells experience at work. Students learn about politics, activism, and persuasive speaking in the classroom. Through this kind of involvement, they see the liberal arts come alive in the world.” 

February, 2004

 


Wells College Offers Summer 2004 Leadership Conferences

For rising 12th grade seniors on beautiful lakeside campus 

Wells College extends its mission of preparing young women for leadership by offering conferences for rising 12th grade girls in two sessions this summer. Students can choose to attend the conference either:

Monday, June 28th through Thursday, July 1st (Session I)

Monday, July 5th through Thursday, July 8th (Session II) 

Workshops provide information and practice in areas important for leadership development such as problem solving, goal setting, public speaking, teamwork, and communication. 

The fee of $175 includes three nights’ accommodation in college residence halls, meals catered by Sodexho Food Service, use of recreational facilities, programs and materials. 

Each student is asked to bring to the conference an issue from her community or school that she feels needs to be addressed. In addition to the workshops, a ropes course, lakefront swimming and evening activities will be provided during the conferences.

The conference is limited to 60 participants in each session, so make your reservations now! 

February, 2004

 


Wells College Hosts Black History Month Event

“Sounds of Sisterhood: A Black Woman’s Story” 

POWERIn celebration of Black History Month, the Wells student club POWER is sponsoring “Sounds of Sisterhood: A Black Woman’s Story” on Thursday, February 26. Beginning at 7:00 pm in the Sommer Student Center, “Sounds of Sisterhood” will offer an evening of arts and fellowship for all. The event is free and open to the public.

A combination of dance, music, art, poetry, and drama, “Sounds of Sisterhood: A Black Woman's Story” is a celebration in honor of Black History Month. Too often the history of black women is overshadowed by the fame of historical black men. This celebration seeks to change that. The evening is a tribute to the black women of the past, present, and future who have shaped our history and who continue to influence it.

 “Sounds of Sisterhood” is sponsored by POWER, Praising Our Work, Ethnicity, and Race. The student organization provides multicultural women on the Wells College campus with support and an extra voice while addressing issues that affect them. POWER acts as a resource for and link between the administration, faculty, and students. The group hosts various activities throughout the year in an effort to increase multicultural awareness and promote harmony in and around the local community. POWER has a continuing commitment to supporting the race, work, and ethnicity of members of the Wells College community.

For more information on “Sounds of Sisterhood” and POWER, please call faculty advisor Vic Munoz at 315/364-3248. 

February, 2004

 


Wells College Students Present at Social Science Colloquium

Wells College seniors Natalie Claire Holly and Emilie Smith will present research findings from their senior thesis projects as part of the college’s Social Science Colloquia series. The presentations will take place on Wednesday, February 18 at 12:30 p.m. in Macmillan Hall’s Art Exhibit Room on the Aurora campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Holly’s talk is entitled “A Dream Deferred: The Quiet Resegregation of Public Schools.” Smith will speak on “Grassroots Development of Sustainable Agriculture: Why NGOs Should Lead the Charge (The Case of Senegal).” Both students are sociology/anthropology majors. 

The Wells Social Science Colloquia series is coordinated by assistant professor of sociology Laura McClusky, who works with her colleagues to bring speakers to campus whose perspectives connect to current classroom topics. “Wells students are also invited to share their research, especially if it has been selected for a national conference presentation,” says Laura. 

Previous speakers include peace studies scholar Robert K. Dentan from SUNY Buffalo; Teri Hover and Stephanie Cyganovich led a panel discussion on transgendered identity and the family; documentary photographer Donna Galluzzo; Chinese dissident poet Yi Ping; and investigative reporter and author Bill Weinberg.

For more information on the Social Science Colloquia series, please call Laura McClusky at 315/364-3252 or visit the series’ site: <http://aurora.wells.edu/~socsci/>.

February, 2004

 


Transgendered Artist Gives Reading at Wells College

S. Bear Bergman of Boston to read from hir book “Butch Is A Noun” 

Bear BergmanWells College welcomes writer, performance artist, instigator and ex post papa S. Bear Bergman back to the Aurora campus this month. Bergman will participate in a residency at Wells the week of February 23 - 26, 2004. While in Aurora, ze will give a public reading of hir book “Butch Is A Noun” on Tuesday evening, February 24 at 7:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room. The reading is free and open to the public. 

S. Bear Bergman has published essays and poems in a variety of books and magazines and is a book reviewer at butchdykeboy.com, as well as a perennial favorite and featured reader at queer spoken word events, such as GenderCrash in Boston. Bear is a frequent lecturer and panelist at high schools, colleges, and universities, including casual lunchtime discussions, “Queer 101” educational panels, classroom and evening lectures, and training for health, counseling, and public safety staff regarding making campuses safer and more affirming for GLBTQ students.

“Ex Post Papa: Life As A Freelance Dyke Dad,” Bear’s first touring solo performance, had its premiere in April of 2002, and has since traveled all over the U.S., including Wells College and stops at the National Gay and Lesbian Theater Festival 2002 (where it won the Best Socio-Political Play award), and the National Transgender Theater Festival 2003, where “Ex Post Papa” was a curated production. 

Bear is a longtime activist on behalf of anyone who wants to learn and be different at the same time (particularly queer/trans youth and students) and is currently working on the creation of a national, web-based, Queer Mentoring Project. Less recently, ze was also one of the five original founders of the first Gay/Straight Alliances, a frequent lecturer at high schools and colleges on the subject of making schools safe for GLBTQ students, and a founding commission member of what is now called the Massachusetts Safe Schools Project. 

S. Bear Bergman was educated at Hampshire College where ze studied poetry with Andrew Salkey and solo performance with Peggy Shaw of Split Britches Theater. Ze is pursuing an M.Ed at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Ze has also been a private student of Kate Bornstein and Gabrielle Hamilton.

As part of hir residency on the Wells campus, Bear will facilitate a series of workshops for interested students, staff, and faculty to raise awareness and educate about transgender issues. Ze will also meet with health and counseling staff to answer questions about gender identity, sexual orientation, and the process of transitioning. 

Bear’s residency is sponsored by the Offices of Experiential Learning and Intercultural Programs, the department of Women’s Studies, and the Student Diversity Committee.

To learn more about Bear Bergman’s residency and public reading, please call Psychology professor Vic Muñoz at 315/364-3248. Additional information about Bear and “Ex Post Papa” may be found on www.expostpapa.com.

February, 2004

 


Skaneateles Book Artist Joins Wells College Faculty

Printer Michael Bixler teaches Intro to Letterpress Printing

Michael Bixler, a book artist and printer from Skaneateles, New York, is teaching Introduction to Letterpress Printing during the spring semester at the Wells College Book Arts Center. The class covers the history of printing, principles of typography and design, and how to care for and use a printing press. 

Wells Book Arts Center Director Terrence Chouinard gives perspective on just how lucky the college is to have Michael Bixler on its faculty: “It’s like having Chopin teaching our students the scales.” 

Michael and his wife Winifred have been involved with the Wells Book Arts Center for over a decade. In 1993, they printed Victor Hammer and the Wells College Press, which recounts the legacy of Hammer, who was professor of fine arts at Wells from 1939 to 1948 and an eminent printer and typographer. 

Bixler says programs like the Wells Book Arts Center are rare in higher education; and for someone who has worked in relative isolation for 30 years, teaching is a welcome change of pace. “As craftsmen, Winnie and I have lived quite a solitary life,” Bixler says. He adds that working with a group and working at a distinguished college like Wells is satisfying and rewarding.

The Bixlers design books and certificates, cast type, and print and bind books at their shop, located in an 1867 mill building near Skaneateles. They met at the Rochester Institute of Technology in the late ‘60s. Since 1973 they have worked together to produce the finest type available to printers worldwide. They are one of three commercial type foundries still operating in the United States. 

The Bixlers also design and create diplomas for such prestigious universities as Yale and Juilliard, and print books for collectors, such as the Limited Editions Club of New York, and museums.

Since the inauguration in 1998 of the Victor Hammer Fellowship, which brings a talented young book artist to Wells for two years, the Bixlers have hosted an apprenticeship for the fellow at their shop. 

To learn more about the Book Arts Center at Wells College, please call Director Terry Chouinard at 315/364-3420 or visit the Center’s website: www.wells.edu/bookarts.  Additional information about Michael and Winifred Bixler may be found at their website: www.mwbixler.com.

February, 2004

 


January Internships – Student Diversity Widens the Wells Network

During January 2004 over 150 Wells students held internships that took them to destinations around the globe including Kenai, Alaska; Long Beach, California; Kingston, Jamaica; Paris, France; and Canton, China. 

“Because students are coming to the college from increasingly diverse geographic locations, they are requesting internships in places familiar to them but which do not yet have established, Wells-affiliated sites,” said Nancy Karpinski, director of career development service. “This is a great opportunity for career services to form new partnerships with organizations. As a result, the Wells connection is broadening into new territories and internship opportunities for all our students are expanding.”

According to Karpinski, a third of the Wells interns this January were first-year students who worked in settings such as theatres, humane societies, legislative offices, and police departments. “This early involvement demonstrates the success of our liberal arts practicum for new students that encourages them to connect classroom learning to professional settings starting in the first year. They come to our office excited about holding internships, and their involvement helps them select a major in which they will excel and, later, find the right career match.”

Other Janaury internship sites included Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York City; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC; Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, California; CVM Television Limited, Kingston, Jamaica; Broadway Inner Circle, New York City; Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Lexington, Massachusetts; Africare, Senegal; Brainchild Productions, Chicago, Illinois; and Rogue River Press, Rogue River, Oregon.

Two students were selected for internships in the college’s Corporate Affiliates program at the Bank of New York in New York City and Wells Fargo Bank’s historical services office in San Francisco. 

“Alumnae make Wells’ internship program a high-quality experience by offering internships where they work, providing housing, and serving as advisors and mentors. This year they sponsored receptions for interns in New York City and Boston. I thank them for their continued support. We know that students benefit from interaction with alumnae, and we hope alumnae can learn from current students about Wells today and the exciting programs we offer,” said Karpinski.

February, 2004

 


Third Annual Gospel Workshop and Concert at Wells College

Wells College Gospel Choir *Appointed*The third annual Wells College Gospel Workshop and Concert Weekend will be held February 20 and 21, 2004. The workshop is a two-day event in which the Wells College community and the local Aurora community come together to learn about and engage in singing this uplifting genre of music. No auditions are required and the event is free and open to the general public. Everyone is warmly invited to lift up their voices during this inspirational weekend event. 

The Gospel Workshop Weekend is coordinated by Wells’ Gospel choir Appointed and the Dean of Students Office. All rehearsals and the concert will be held in Barler Recital Hall. The weekend schedule is as follows:

Friday, February 20
Rehearsal 7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Saturday, February 21
Rehearsal 9:00-1:00 p.m.
Concert 7:30 p.m.

Interested parties are encouraged to show up for rehearsals; no advance registration is necessary. Participants must attend all rehearsals. The culminating concert is free and open to all. 

Gospel Weekend and Appointed are the brainchildren of Wells’ Dean of Students Karen Green, who will coordinate the weekend. L. Kirk Hatcher of Montgomery, Alabama will be choir director, and Ed Menifee of Atlanta, Georgia serves as music director.

For more information about Gospel Weekend and the concert, please contact Jenn Bell in the Dean of Students Office at 315/364-3311.

February, 2004

 


College Without Walls

Professor Catherine BurroughsWells’ January term 2004 gave students and faculty members an opportunity to add breadth and depth to their classroom work through off-campus study in a wide variety of interesting settings.

Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Niamh O’Leary took six students to the Florida Everglades to participate in one of the world’s largest ecological restoration projects. Through a combination of service learning, field experiences, and discussions with environmental professionals, the Wells women explored the impact of humans on a unique, freshwater ecosystem. 

British Actress Frances Anne Kemble’s landmark publication, Journal of Residence on a Georgia Plantation 1838-39, served as the central text for Associate Professor of English Catherine Burrough’s January course. Using St. Simon’s Island as a home base, she and six students immersed themselves in the history, culture, and environment of the Georgia sea islands. 

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religion Ernie Olson took three students to the Islands of Hawaii for fieldwork and experiential learning. They studied Native Hawaiian culture and history, environmental preservation, and agricultural development of sugar cane and coffee, among other topics.

Other January term courses provided academic credit for students who attended the Art Students League in New York City and the Women and Public Policy (PLEN) Seminars in Washington, DC. Students also participated in Wells programs that took them to Spain (as well as other European travel) and Senegal. 

February, 2004

 


Elizabethan Conversation Offers Third Concert in the Aurora Inn Series

Susan Sandman and ensemble present “A Winter Joy”

Elizabethan ConversationThe melodious notes of Elizabethan music will once again fill the crisp air in Aurora. On Sunday, February 22, at 4:00 pm, Elizabethan Conversation will present “A Winter Joy” concert at the beautiful Aurora Inn. Admission is $5.00. All are warmly invited to enjoy the splendid live acoustics and intimate setting of the Inn’s Lakeside Room, located at 391 Main Street.

Elizabethan Conversation is Susan Sandman and Derwood Crocker of Aurora. They will be joined this day by trained tenor Gary Aubin, also of Aurora. “A Winter Joy” offers the olde English music of Shakespeare’s time played on period instruments. In addition to art songs for tenor, lute, and bass viol, the concert includes dance songs for treble viol and lute, plus a solo recorder piece. Featured composers are John Dowland, Thomas Campian, Tobias Humes, and Richard Nicholson.

Early music performer and musicologist Susan Sandman earned her B.A. in music from Vassar College and a Ph.D. in musicology from Stanford University. Now a professor emerita from Wells College, Susan devotes her time to music performance, particularly with the viol consort of the Syracuse-based Schola Cantorum, as well as solo recitals. She also serves as the researcher and organizer for all programs offered by Elizabethan Conversation. 

Derwood Crocker’s interest in design, sculpture, and music led him to making musical instruments. He has been a full-time craftsman and musician for almost 40 years. The Crocker Workshop has produced hundreds of instruments, some now found in private and public collections. The two viols used in “A Winter Joy” were produced in his workshop. Crocker also practices art restoration. 

Tenor Gary Aubin has trained under Renata Carisio in New York City. He holds an M.S. in Voice from The College of St. Rose, and has performed in numerous engagements in the U.S. and Canada. Gary is currently a general manager for Sodexho Campus Food Services at Wells College.

As Elizabethan Conversation, Crocker and Sandman have performed together at many venues around New York State, including Hamilton, Elmira, Heidelberg, and Wells Colleges; SUNY at Binghamton, New Paltz, Potsdam, and Buffalo; Cornell, Colgate, and St. Lawrence Universities; Tompkins County and Liverpool public libraries; the Everson Museum in Syracuse, the Johnson Art Museum at Cornell, and the Plattsburgh Autumn Festival.

For more information about the concert and Elizabethan Conversation, please contact Susan Sandman at 315/364-8406. Additional information about the Aurora Inn, including directions to the concert, may be found at www.aurora-inn.com or by calling the Inn at 315/364-8888.

February, 2004

 


Pall Trinity Corporation Environmental Specialist Will Speak at Wells College

Pat Stock, environmental health and safety manager of Pall Trinity Corporation’s Cortland, New York division, will be the featured speaker in the Wells Science Colloquium Series on Friday, February 13. Her presentation, “Environmental Health and Safety: Workplace Issues and Career Opportunities,” will begin at 12:40 p.m. in Zabriskie Hall, Room 102, on the Wells campus in Aurora. The event is free and open to the public.

With headquarters in East Hills, Long Island, Pall Corporation is the largest and most diverse filtrations, separations, and purifications company in the world, helping a wide array of clients solve complex, liquid contamination problems. Their products contribute to increased safety and liquid purity in water treatment, power generation, medical and pharmaceutical fields, and the food and beverage industry. 

In recent years, Pall Trinity of Cortland has created a 20 million gallon per day water treatment facility for the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority and was selected by General Electric Corporation to produce water filtration systems for a nuclear power plant in Taiwan. Pall generates $1.6 billion in revenue annually. (For more information visit www.pall.com)

The Wells Science Colloquium Series is organized by two Wells faculty members: Niamh O’Leary, associate professor of environmental studies, and Carol Shilepsky, professor of mathematics and computer science. Other faculty members in the sciences contribute by inviting speakers and organizing the colloquia that focus on internships.

According to Professor O’Leary, this series brings scientists and speakers in a variety of science-related fields to campus. “These presentations keep students and faculty up-to-date with current scientific research and connected with the wider scientific community. It also serves as a venue for students to explore possible career venues,” she says.

Wells alumnae in the sciences are frequently invited to return to campus to make presentations in the series. The series also provides an opportunity for members of the Wells community to share their work. All science majors present the results of their senior thesis projects in the Science Colloquium. Information about internship opportunities and outcomes are disseminated, and audience members are able to network with professionals in many fields. 

Recent speakers include Wells alumna Anna Jensen ’98 of Ithaco Space Systems; Dr. Robert Smith, department of bioengineering and neuroscience, Syracuse University; summer research and internship presentations by Wells students; and Dr. M. Todd Walter, senior research associate in biological and environmental engineering, Cornell University.

For more information about the Wells College Science Colloquium Series, visit http://aurora.wells.edu/~science/ or call 315.364.3212. 

February, 2004

 


Wells College Participates in Martin Luther King Day of Service

Partnership with Booker T. Washington Center honors civil rights leader

Wells College Day of ServiceOn Monday, January 19, as our nation paused to reflect on the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., individuals from Wells College honored Dr. King’s legacy by participating in a community service project with the Booker T. Washington Community Center in Auburn.

Wells College President Lisa Marsh Ryerson shared her thoughts on the project: “Honoring this important day through engagement of service to others enables our community to experience our college’s motto, Habere et Dispertire – ‘to have and to share’.”

Coretta Scott King once said, “Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is not only for celebration and remembrance, education and tribute, but above all a day of service.”  In keeping with that sentiment, Wells Chaplain James K. Boodley coordinated a service project for the Wells community.

“Dean of Students Karen Green approached me last fall about doing a service project around the MLK holiday,” said Boodley. “Based on successful past collaborations Wells has had with the Center, it seemed an excellent choice. The folks at BTWCC were so enthusiastic about Wells’ involvement last fall, we were delighted when they welcomed us back to celebrate this special day with them.”

Wells College Day of Service
Twenty individuals from Wells, along with approximately 20 Auburn community members, met at the Center at 9:00 am. Wells provided van transportation from Aurora and granted its employees release time to participate in the project. Work assignments included cleaning the Center, painting interior walls and offices, and organizing the Center’s main storage room. A communal potluck lunch provided an opportunity for all to gather during the workday to share stories and fellowship.

The Booker T. Washington Community Center, founded in 1927, is a not-for-profit agency which provides services to assist the community in promoting civil rights, justice and equality. The Center offers comprehensive youth development services and programs for children of all ages.

Chaplain Boodley was pleased with the final results. “The folks at BTWCC were incredibly enthusiastic about having the Wells community join them for a morning of work in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life. In a political climate of needlessly strained relationships in this nation, no doubt Dr. King would be pleased.” 

February, 2004

 


Annual Student Art Show Opens at Wells College

An eclectic mix of art will be on display in Wells College’s String Room Gallery from February 11 - March 5, 2004. Artwork produced by students enrolled in studio art classes during the Fall 2003 semester will be shown. The exhibit is free and the public is cordially invited to view the show. An opening reception with refreshments on Wednesday, February 11 from 7:00-9:00 pm offers an opportunity to meet the student artists and view and discuss their work.

More than 50 students are exhibiting this year. Media represented include advertising art, painting, ceramics, photography, design, drawing, and more. Art professor William Roberts oversees the students’ work in the studios and coordinates the installation of the show.

Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information about the show and art classes at Wells, please contact William Roberts at 315/364-3237.

February, 2004

 


Wells College Ushers in New Semester with Spring 2004  Convocation

Keynote speaker is Vivian Malone-Jones

Vivian Malone-Jones and president Lisa Marsh RyersonAs it traditionally does, Wells College will open the spring 2004 semester with a convocation ceremony this afternoon, February 2 at 4:45 pm in Phipps Auditorium. The theme for convocation is “Opening Doors, Opening Minds.” The entire campus community is invited to help usher in the new semester.

Dean of Students Karen Green and Collegiate Cabinet president Tazeem Pasha ’04 collaborated to bring special keynote speaker, Vivian Malone-Jones, to campus this year. Vivian Malone was one of two African-American students that then-Governor George Wallace tried to keep from attending the University of Alabama in 1963. Although she graduated from the University in 1965, Vivian endured prejudice, racism, and ostracism during her two years there. Eventually Wallace reversed his stand on integration, and in 1996, he honored Malone-Jones with the first Lurleen B. Wallace Award of Courage. The award is given to a woman who has overcome adversity and advanced herself and the state of Alabama.

“Collegiate was looking for someone who could speak to the various political persuasions and perspectives,” shares Karen. “I met Vivian Malone-Jones several years ago when I was working at Hamilton College, and suggested her because she is an excellent role model. She is an African-American woman who used her voice as a means of upsetting the status quo in the segregated South forty years ago.” 

Vivian Malone-Jones in a classroom in the 1970sVivian Malone-Jones was the first African-American graduate of the University of Alabama. She earned a management degree in 1965, and was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in August 2000. The University of Alabama has honored Ms. Malone-Jones as one of its outstanding women graduates, and has endowed the Vivian Malone-Jones Scholarship Fund. Her portrait hangs in Bidgood Hall, home to the College of Commerce and Business Administration.

Ms. Malone-Jones has been featured on all the major television networks as well as the History Channel and Boston Public Television as part of the JFK series. She has held several positions in the federal government, and was named executive director of the Voter Education Project, Inc., becoming the first female CEO of the Atlanta-based non-profit organization. She is a past president of Real Estate Professionals, Inc. and Metro Medical Equipment Co. She has served as a financial advisor and insurance associate, and is currently writing a book about her experiences at the University of Alabama in the 1960s. 

Ms. Malone-Jones has received numerous awards and honors, including the NAACP Emancipation Day Award; Atlanta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Torch Award; Concerned Black Clergy Award; YWCA Smith-Breckenridge Award; a listing in the international Who’s Who of Professionals; the Environmental Protection Agency’s Silver Medal; and the African-American Association of the University of Alabama Award.

For more information about Spring Convocation and Vivian Malone-Jones, please contact director of communications Gwen Webber-McLeod at 315/364-3260 or via email at gmcleod@wells.edu.

February, 2004

 


Wells College Soccer Team Supports U.S. Troops in Iraq

Squad raises money for soldiers’ recreational soccer team in the Middle East

The Wells College soccer team paid special tribute to U.S. soldiers in Iraq last fall. Led by athletic trainer Julie Swain and head coach Chris Perkins, the squad raised nearly $1,000 to sponsor a recreational soccer team. 

When Julie saw on the news that the U.S. Army was seeking financial support for soccer teams, she located a woman in Syracuse whose daughter was coordinating the effort in Iraq. She then brought the idea to the soccer players, who responded enthusiastically. The funds were sent overseas to purchase equipment and specially-made red jerseys with “Wells” emblazoned on the front.

“This was a way for us to make a small difference. Without taking a stance on the war, we wanted to support Americans in Iraq and show our love of the game,” said Swain.

For their efforts, they were awarded a Wolverine Certificate of Appreciation from the 94th Engineer Combat Battalion (Heavy) “for displaying outstanding patriotism in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Your dedication to our soldiers undoubtedly increased morale and contributed to mission success.” An accompanying letter stated in part “It is awesome to see our soldiers truly enjoying the game of soccer. They call the few hours spent on the field each week their sanity and freedom. Releasing stress on the field allows them to focus when it comes time to carry out the mission.”

To learn more about the soccer team and sports in general at Wells College, please call Coach Julie Swain at 315/364-3411 or athletic administrator Lyn LaBar at 315/364-3410.

February, 2004

 


Powerful Dance Troupe Lights Up the Wells College Stage

Renowned Koresh Dance Company of Philadelphia blends many styles

Wells College Fall Dance Concert 2003The Wells College Arts and Lecture Series proudly welcomes the Koresh Dance Company of Philadelphia to the Aurora campus. This intense, vibrant troupe will captivate the audience in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on Saturday, February 7, at 7:30 pm. All are cordially invited to experience this exhilarating performance. Prices are $3 for students and children, $6 for senior citizens and the Wells College community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets are available from the college bookstore or the box office the week preceding the show, and at the door the night of the performance. Please call 315/364-3456 or 364-3428 to reserve seats.

Renowned for their powerful stage presence and high-energy style, Philadelphia’s Koresh Dance Company presents its audiences with an exciting and emotional blend of ballet, modern, and jazz. Each performance strives to offer a balance of dark and intense, lighthearted, and sensual pieces to create a varied show. The troupe prides itself on offering a technically superior mix that is both uniquely complex and beautiful.

The Company was founded in 1991 by Israeli-born choreographer Ronen Koresh. His eclectic repertoire features a style of choreography that is both eloquent and explosive. Ronen has taught his techniques at the Koresh Company Studios as well as Philadelphia’s University of the Arts, where he has been a faculty member since 1986. Koresh is a multi-year recipient of choreography fellowships from the Pew Charitable Trusts, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, and the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. The Company’s critically acclaimed work attracts a continually increasing audience, and Koresh’s reputation for passion and outstanding technique regularly results in sold-out performances. 

Wells College Fall Dance Concert 2003While in Aurora, the troupe will also present a master dance class for Wells dance students, led by professor Jeanne Goddard.

For more information about the Koresh Dance Company and their Aurora performance, please contact assistant dean for campus involvement Meagen Mulherin at 315/364-3428. Additional information about the Company may also be found on the troupe’s website - www.koreshdance.org.  Members of the media may arrange for an interview or photo session with artistic director Ronen Koresh by contacting director of communications Gwen Webber-McLeod at 315/364-3260 or via email at gmcleod@wells.edu

The Wells College Arts and Lecture Series features professional guest artists and performers who are brought to campus to enrich the cultural and academic components of Wells as a learning community. The acts are selected annually by a committee comprised of Wells faculty, staff, administrators, and students.

January, 2004

 

 
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