Wells College News Archives 2002

News stories from the College's archives.

Webber-McLeod Manages Message, Building Strategic Partnerships

Gwendolyn Webber-McLeod, Wells College Director of CommunicationsGwendolyn Webber-McLeod was appointed director of communications in June 2002 and is no stranger to Wells. Ann Rollo, Wells College vice president of external relations, made this appointment. Over the past 20 years she has worked with the community to support numerous projects and initiatives. Most recently, she served as President Lisa Ryerson’s special assistant for diversity initiatives.

As director of communications, she is a member of the external relations staff and manages internal and external communications. In addition, she develops strategies to build partnerships for the college by linking Wells with institutions that will advance its goal of educating women for leadership in the 21st century.

Gwen has 24 years experience in public relations, marketing, leadership and workplace development, motivational speaking, and board facilitation. She gained this expertise through past professional positions as an owner and partner in Treble Associates, a women-owned, Auburn-based consulting firm, along with a number of other professional positions.

She has been communications/development director of the Seven Lakes Girl Scout Council, executive director of the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, executive director of the Booker T. Washington Community Center in Auburn, and coordinator of human services for the Cayuga/Seneca Community Action Agency.

An advocate in the public arena for the positive development of girls and women, she has received many awards and honors including the Unsung Heroine Award, presented by the Central New York N.O.W. Chapter and the New York State Governor’s Award for African-Americans of Distinction.

Gwen has also received the Marjorie Dowdell Fortitude Award, presented to outstanding African-American women by the Syracuse Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Potsdam College added her name to the State University of New York Confederation Honor Roll.

She is board chair of Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/Syracuse region, a founding mother of the Friends of Women’s Rights National Park, past board president of the Cayuga County Chamber of Commerce, and a past member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame Board of Directors.

Additionally, she is a former trustee of Cayuga Community College and served as a member of the Cayuga Community College Foundation Board of Directors.

December, 2002

 


Wells College “Son” Hosts Film Screening and Q & A Session

Film maker Gabriel TorresFilmmaker Gabriel Torres will host a screening of his latest movie “Last Stand” at Cinemapolis in Ithaca next week. Torres is the son of Wells College psychology professor Aurelio Torres and college cataloging librarian Elsie Torres. Now a resident of Los Angeles, Gabe is home in Aurora for the holidays. “Last Stand” plays for three nights during Christmas week - December 25, 26, and 27 at the theatre on the Ithaca Commons. Torres will host a question and answer session following the early screening on Friday, December 27.

“Last Stand” is a short subject film which tells the story of a young Lakota boy who befriends a wounded cavalry soldier at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Set in the summer of 1876, Goes Alone, a 12-year-old Sioux boy, discovers a dying soldier, James, hidden in the grass following the devastating fight. Over the next few days, the two form a bond as James approaches death. When Goes Alone performs a healing ritual on James, James is restored to health. As he departs to resume his army duties, he leaves a special gift for Goes Alone, one which results in tragic circumstances. “Last Stand” is shown as part of a double feature with Phillip Noyce’s “Rabbit-Proof Fence.” Based on a true story set in Australia during the 1930s, three half-aboriginal girls are taken from their homes, educated in the dominant white culture, and trained as domestic servants. The girls flee the state-run institution and travel alone 1,500 miles back to their home village.

Gabe Torres grew up in Aurora, New York and attended high school at Southern Cayuga Central School. He is a graduate of the University of Southern California Film School. Two of his previous films, “The Legend of Firefly Marsh” (1987) and “December” (1991) were shot in Aurora and on the Wells College campus.

For more information about Gabe Torres and the screening, please call the filmmaker directly at 315/364-8478 or visit his website  www.pacificnet.net/~gabe/  More information about “Last Stand” may be found at www.laststandmovie.com  Contact Cinemapolis directly for prices and showtimes at 607/277-6115.

December, 2002

 


Renowned Typographer Subject of  Book Arts Lecture at Wells College

Herbert H. Johnson of Rochester Institute of Technology will present this fall’s Susan Garretson Swartzburg ’60 Memorial Book Arts Lecture at Wells College. The lecture, entitled “Bruce Rogers at the Riverside Press,” will be given at 8:00 pm on Sunday, December 8 in the Art Exhibit Room of Macmillan Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

Herb Johnson, a professor in the School of Printing Management and Sciences at RIT, will speak on the early work of the renowned typography Bruce Rogers. Bruce Rogers (1870-1957) was a typographic adviser and book designer for such renowned printing establishments and publishing houses as the Riverside Press, William E. Rudge, Cambridge University Press, and Harvard University Press. Based on Nicolas Jenson's Roman type of 1470, his elegant 'Centaur' type, commissioned by the New York Metropolitan Museum, is considered by many to be one of the most perfect typefaces ever designed. His reputation as the leading American classical typographer of the first half of the 20th century remains unchallenged.

Following the lecture, a reception will be held in the Book Arts Center in Morgan Hall where participants may speak with Johnson and view an exhibit of Rogers’ work. The exhibit will remain on display through March 8, 2003. A catalogue especially printed for this exhibition by Bixler Press of Skaneateles will be available for sale.

The lecture series is made possible through the Heiland-Garretson Book Arts Lecture Fund, established and sustained through the generosity of Susan Garretson Swartzburg, Wells College Class of 1960.

Wells College has an incomparable resource in the Book Arts Center, which consists of the Wells College Press and the Class of 1932 Bindery. The BAC functions as a learning center, sponsoring classes, exhibitions, lectures, demonstrations, workshops and symposia in the fine arts, literary arts, bookbinding, printing, publishing, and related fields. It is a classroom, laboratory, and a library for information and inspiration, and serves as a magnet for all who wish to study the art of the book.

November, 2002

 


Senior Dance Show, Puzzled, Performed at Wells College

Puzzled: Dance Show by Shannon FunkeThe Wells College Performing Arts Department presents Puzzled, a senior thesis in dance show.  This world premier work by Shannon Funke, class of 2003, has been choreographed and directed by Shannon, and will be danced by Shannon and seven other Wells students. The cast will intrigue audiences for just two nights, Friday, December 6 and Saturday, December 7, at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall.  Puzzled is free and the public is warmly welcome to attend.

Puzzled explores our search for identity in a world full of stereotypes. The piece begins by introducing Funke's character and then the rest of the ensemble. Throughout the performance, the ensemble confronts Funke with popular images. The piece moves rapidly, filling the space with each character telling her own story from within the group and through solo dance.

Funke choreographed Puzzled collaboratively, encouraging ensemble members to add their own input and ideas. The creative process involved collage making, journal writing, small choreographic studies, and improvisation.  Together, the ensemble created both the dance itself and a cohesive partnership. “They are not only eager to see and hear my ideas but also eager to share their own and be an active part of the creative process,” said Funke. “They really helped this piece come alive and tell a story.”

The piece is staged in the glow of original light design by Wells alumna Dena Borders ’01.  Sarah Jo Beck ’05 and Kiri Anne Green ’06 provide additional technical support, as well as stage manager Dana Finegan ’04. Associate professor of dance Jeanne Goddard supervised the students in their efforts.
For more information about Puzzled or the Wells College dance program, please contact dance professor Jeanne Goddard at 315/364-3213.

November, 2002

 


Artist Gives Slide Presentation and Gallery Talk at Wells College

Award-winning artist Todd Ayoung will give a slide presentation and gallery talk at Wells College on Thursday, November 21.  Beginning at 3:00 pm in Morgan Hall room #2, Ayoung will discuss his ongoing collaboration with Colombian artist Carlos Andrade. The two have had their latest exhibit, “Intensive,” on display in Wells College’s String Room Gallery this fall. The exhibit runs through Friday, December 6, and is free and open to the public for viewing. The public is also invited to Ayoung’s lecture on November 21.

Following the discussion, the group will move to the String Room Gallery, where Ayoung will do a walk-through of the exhibit, providing insight into each piece. Andrade and Ayoung have collaborated since 2000 on artworks that engage the spectators’ perception of representations of the aftermath of disasters, both natural and human-made. The main body of "Intensive" contains 20 monotypes on paper which reflect the visual aftermath of such disasters. It is tempting to relate this exhibit to the events of September 11. However, Ayoung and Andrade have had a long-standing interest in the definitions of disaster, and these pieces were actually created in February 2002 during an artist residency at Lafayette College in Easton, PA.

Carlos Andrade is a native of Colombia. Andrade earned his B.F.A. from the Rhode Island School of Design. He has exhibited his work in group and solo displays in the U.S. and internationally, including Denmark, Colombia, Monaco, and France. Todd Ayoung is originally from Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. He earned his M.F.A. in Sculpture from Yale University, and has shown his work in solo and group exhibitions in the United States and in Denmark, Austria, and England.

String Room Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. while school is in session. For more information about the lecture, the exhibit, and the artists, please contact art professor Bill Roberts at 315/364-3237.

November, 2002

 


Prize-Winning Poet to Read at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to bring renowned poet X. J. Kennedy to campus on Wednesday, November 13. The reading will take place in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall at 8:00 pm. The occasion for his visit is the publication of his seventh book of poetry, The Lords of Misrule: Poems 1992-2001. There is no charge, and the public is welcome to attend.

Mr. Kennedy is one of the country’s best known and most respected anthologists, editors, and writers of literature textbooks. His Cross-Ties: Selected Poems won the Los Angeles Times Book Award for 1985, his textbook, An Introduction to Poetry, is in its tenth edition, and he has received the Aiken Taylor Award for Lifetime Achievement in Modern American Poetry as well as Guggenheim and National Arts Council fellowships. He is the much-loved author of eighteen books for children, including novels and collections of poems and nonsense verse. He has been called one of "the most energetic and versatile of American poets," and he is certainly one of the most entertaining. A reading by Mr. Kennedy is regarded by those who have experienced one as an event not to be missed.

Copies of X. J. Kennedy’s books will be available at the college bookstore and at the reading. Kennedy’s work is also on display in the Long Library at Wells College. Mr. Kennedy is this year’s Virginia Kent Cummins Writer-in-Residence. His visit is made possible by both the Virginia Kent Cummins endowment and by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.

For more information about X.J. Kennedy and the reading, please contact Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228. Members of the media may arrange an interview or photo session with the speaker by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

November, 2002

 


Fargo Renovations Move Forward

Exterior renovations to the Fargo, a restaurant and bar on Main Street, Aurora, are underway. The Fargo will remain open through the holiday season for the benefit of the community. The restaurant is scheduled to close in early January 2003 for interior renovations. A March 2003 reopening is anticipated.

The red brick Federal-style building, located across the street from the Aurora Inn, was constructed in 1834. In keeping with historic pictures of the structure, plans call for moving the front door to its original center opening and adding a porch across the front of the building. Inside, two original fireplaces will be uncovered and made operable, and the kitchen will be updated. New restrooms and a poolroom will be added at the back of the restaurant, increasing the size of the pub area.

Plans also include adding a new pizza parlor on the first floor of the Fargo building. Its menu will feature fresh homemade pizza and submarine sandwiches. There will be seating for twenty, as well as carryout and delivery service.

According to the college, upgrading the Fargo and adding a pizza shop will increase social opportunities for students and increase services in the village.It will also provide a future source of revenue for the college.

The Aurora Foundation is overseeing the project.  The Aurora Foundation is a partnership between Wells College and the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation whose purpose is to support the college's mission by improving the college's commercial properties and enhancing economic development in the village.  The college retains ownership of its commercial properties and the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation provides the capital for renovations.

For more information, please contact: Ann S. Rollo, Wells College vice president for external relations, at 315. 364. 3416 or Catharine B. Waller, executive director of the Aurora Foundation, at 315. 364. 7253.

November, 2002

 


Table Music Performed by the Frogwork Consort at Wells College

Wells College and the Aurora Community Enrichment Program join together in presenting Table Music, a concert by The Frogwork Consort. The recital will take place on Friday, November 8 at 7:00 pm in the String Room Gallery, Main Building, on the Aurora campus. This special music is free and the public is warmly invited to attend.

In Shakespeare’s time, music was often played at home after a meal, providing the evening’s entertainment. The gentry would sing and play while sitting around the table; thus, this type of intimate, and often intricate, chamber music was called “table music.” The Frogwork Consort, a group of viols, will perform music of this type composed by 17th century English masters Gibbons, Locke, and Tomkins.

The Frogwork Consort is comprised of three extraordinary musicians. Susan Sandman, Wells College professor emerita of music, is a founding member of and performs with Elizabethan Conversation, as well as with the Viol Consort of Schola Cantorum of Syracuse. Alexander Raykov performs internationally on viol and lute, and is the viol master of the Schola Cantorum. Lee Johnston is the minister of music at the First English Lutheran Church and Collegium director at Syracuse University. He works at Onondaga Music Services and plays also with the Schola Cantorum. The name Frogwork refers both to the block that separates the bow hair from the bow wood on the instruments, called a frog, as well as to the frog-like position viol players often take to hold their instruments. Two of the instruments played by Frogwork, the tenor and bass viol, were built by local musician Derwood Crocker in his Aurora workshop.

For more information about Table Music or The Frogwork Consort, please contact Susan Sandman at 315/364-8406.

November, 2002
 


Wells College Adds Two to Division of Student Affairs

Karen Green, Dean of Students at Wells College, announces the addition of two new staff members to the Division of Student Affairs. These appointments come at a time when college leaders are creating initiatives to enrich the liberal arts experience by making stronger connections between the classroom and campus life.  Joining the Division of Student Affairs are:

Meagen P. Mulherin, Director of Student Activities

Meagen P. MulherinMeagen P. Mulherin earned her master's degree in higher education administration from Syracuse University and her bachelor's degree from Elmira College. In her new position Mulherin is a senior member of the Division of Student Affairs and is responsible for:

  • planning campus-wide events
  • student orientation programs
  • development of the college master calendar
  • coordination of Sommer Center operations and activities
  • chairing the college's arts and lectures committee
  • development of workshops on leadership and membership development for student organizations

Mulherin comes to Wells with a demonstrated record of success in student affairs. Most recently she served as assistant director of Student Activities at the Dana Commons at Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. As a graduate assistant at Syracuse University she was responsible for general operations of the Schine Student Center. For this work she received the 2001 Manager of the Year Award from the university in recognition of her efforts. She also has extensive experience in the field of student recruitment.
 
 

Daniel A. Van Vechten, Assistant Dean of Students for Residence Life

Daniel A. Van VechtenDaniel A. Van Vechten earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Syracuse University. In his new position Van Vechten is responsible for coordinating, supervising, and evaluating a full range of residential life programs that are designed to complement and support the educational mission of Wells College. This work includes:

  • encouraging and aiding students  and organizations in the development of social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs that expand student involvement in the campus community and society
  • encouraging students' personal growth and development
  • assisting students in leadership development and related skills competencies
  • educating students regarding institutional policies and procedures

Previously, Van Vechten was an area coordinator in the residence life programs at the University of Rochester. There he worked to build a living and learning community for 500 resident students. He managed resident advisors; supervised special interest housing for students in music, computer science, and other fields; and had primary judiciary responsibility for more than 1000 students.  As a residence hall director at Utica College of Syracuse University, Utica New York, he served as advisor to the college's Womyn's Resource Center, which gave him their Male Ally for Women's Empowerment Award in 2001.

" Teaching and learning should not be bound by categories of 'in or outside' the classroom," said Dean Green. "All aspects of teaching and learning at Wells must promote and support our mission to educate women in the liberal arts and prepare students for leadership and service to society. I am pleased to welcome these two new professionals to Wells. I know they will make many positive contributions to building a true learning community."

October, 2002

 


Dances Unveiled - Wells College Presents Annual Fall Dance Concert

Dances UnveiledThe Wells College Performing Arts Department and the Dance Collective present the long-anticipated fall dance concert - Dances Unveiled. There will be two performances only: Friday, November 8 and Saturday, November 9 at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on the Wells College campus in Aurora, New York.  Prices are $3.00 for children and students, $6 for seniors and the Wells community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets may be purchased at the college bookstore and the box office the week preceding the show. Please call the box office at 315/364-3456 for reservations.

Faculty and guest choreographers will present seven pieces performed by twelve student dancers, setting a mood which ranges from poignant to jubilant to absurdly comic. A special feature will be "Labyrinth," one of two premieres in the concert, choreographed specifically for this 12-woman ensemble by artistic director and associate professor of dance, Jeanne Goddard.  The piece, performed to a score written by local composer Ethan MacCormick, evokes images of a maze as it winds across the stage, chasing something powerful.  A newspaper headline about the war in Afghanistan, "To Hunt in the Shadows, Get Better Eyes," inspired this piece. "Since visiting Central Asia two years ago," says Goddard, "I’ve become increasingly aware of ancient civilizations and cultures that can be buried or hidden or misunderstood [in that area of the world]. I wanted to bring that awareness to the audience with this piece."

Dances UnveiledGuest artist Lesley Tillotson of Rochester contributes another premier, a sextet exploring person-to-person relationships, our (un)willingness to make contact with others, and the layers that need to be stripped away to be in touch with other human beings. Tillotson, a member of the dance department faculty at SUNY-Brockport, works in close collaboration with her dancers, drawing some choreographic material from improvisation and asking them to contribute their personal stories to the creative process. Before coming to rehearsal, she asks each dancer to observe "the mechanics of touch, the pressure, the contact points, the distance between the people…" In this way, the dancers draw from life experience to shape the choreography. The dance, Inner Mappings, is set to a score for unaccompanied cello written by Tcherepnin and O’Connor, and performed by Yo Yo Ma.

Dances Unveiled will also include four pieces from Goddard’s repertory.  Four solo works spanning 25 years of choreographic energy open the concert.  The pieces were chosen for contrast style as well as for their music or sound accompaniment; two are comedies and two are more lyrical dances. They will be performed by students from Goddard’s Advanced Repertory course.

Goddard will also perform her own work in a new solo entitled "Something about a lamp…"  This piece will also be danced to a MacCormick score, this time featuring the voice of Wells College professor emeritus Hugo Theimer.

For more information about Dances Unveiled or the Wells College dance program, please contact dance professor Jeanne Goddard at 315/364-3213.

More photos from Dances Unveiled:   Ensemble Photo 1Ensemble Photo 2

October, 2002

 



Former Nader VP Running Mate Winona LaDuke Lectures on Native American Issues at Wells College

Wells College students in Moliere's ScapinWells College is most pleased to welcome Native environmental activist and former vice presidential candidate Winona LaDuke to campus for a lecture on Tuesday, November 5. Ms. LaDuke will speak in the Chapel in Main Building beginning at 7:00 pm. Her talk is free and the public is warmly invited to hear her speak on “Native American Environments: Struggles for Land and Life.” A question and answer session will follow.

Winona LaDuke, the two-time vice presidential running mate of Ralph Nader, is an acclaimed Native environmental activist and author. She is a member of the Mississippi Band of Anishinaabeg and resides on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota. LaDuke became involved in Native American activism while a student at Harvard University. At the age of 18, she spoke in front of the United Nations regarding Indian issues and since has become known internationally as a voice for American Indian economic and environmental concerns. She is the program director of the Honor the Earth Fund and founding director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project. Ms. LaDuke has authored several books, including All Our Relations: Struggles for Land and Life, and her most recent, Last Standing Woman. In 1995, she was named one of “50 leaders for the future” by Time magazine. Ms. LaDuke continues to be a spokesperson for the Chippewa people of northern Minnesota, remains active with the Indigenous Women’s Network, an agency which she founded, and teaches Native Environmentalism at the University of Minnesota.

Ms. LaDuke’s presentation on the Wells College campus is sponsored by the Dean of the College, Collegiate, the Dean of Intercultural Programs, the President’s Committee on Diversity, WLLS 101: The First Year Experience, Wells College Greens, the Office of Student Activities, the Division of Social Sciences, Economics and Management, and the departments of International Studies, Psychology, Public Affairs, Sociology and Anthropology, Women’s Studies, and Environmental Policy, Science and Values.

For more information about Winona LaDuke and her lecture, please contact Anthropology professor Ernie Olson at 315/364-3206, Dean of Intercultural Programs Carolyn Morales at 315/364-3312, or visit the website at www.wells.edu. Members of the press may arrange an interview or photo session with Ms. LaDuke following the talk by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


Visiting Poet and Short Story Writer Reading at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series welcomes poet and short story author Peter Makuck to campus. On Wednesday, November 6, Dr. Makuck will read excerpts from his newly released short story collection entitled Costly Habits. The reading will take place in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall at 8:00 pm, and is free and open to the public.

Dr. Makuck has written several short story collections, including Breaking and Entering, published by the University of Illinois Press. One of these stories, “Filling the Igloo,” was selected for publication in The Best of the Southern Review. He also co-edited An Open World, a collection of essays about former Wells College Visiting Writer Leslie Norris.

In addition to fiction, Dr. Makuck is also a distinguished poet. His publications include Where We Live (1982), The Sunken Lightship (1990), and Against Distance (1998). Dr. Makuck received the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Award for his book of poems, Pilgrims, in 1989. His poems have also appeared in Poetry, The Yale Review, The Nation, The Southern Review, and The American Scholar. He received his Ph.D. in American Literature from Kent State University.

Copies of Costly Habits will be available for purchase at the Wells College bookstore and at the reading. The Visiting Writer Series is supported by The New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-In-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-In-Residence Fund. Several writers will be on campus during the academic year. For more information about Peter Makuck or the reading, please call Bruce Bennett, Professor of English, at 315-364-3228.

October, 2002

 


Wells – Great School, Great Price

Wells is ranked #ll nationwide among four-year liberal arts colleges offering quality education at an affordable cost in the 2003 edition of America’s Best Colleges, published by U.S. News & World Report.

We are the highest-rated women’s college in the category this year, coming in above Wellesley (#17), Bryn Mawr (#23), Agnes Scott (#26), and Mount Holyoke (#28).

The ranking was determined by using a formula that compares a school’s academic quality to the cost of attendance for a student receiving the average financial aid package.

“The higher the quality of the program and the lower the cost, the better the deal. We consider only schools ranked in the top half of their categories, since we believe the most significant values are among colleges that are above average,” says the report.

The top quality/value ratings this year go to Amherst (#1) and Williams (#2).  Other schools rated in this category include Colgate (#6), Middlebury (#13), and Oberlin (#15).

October, 2002

 


Awards for Schemings of Scapin

Wells College students in Moliere's ScapinThe Wells production of Moliere’s The Schemings of Scapin (performed on September 13 and 14) received numerous merit awards for outstanding accomplishments from the Theatre Association of New York State (TANYS) in the following categories:

• Acting (to the entire cast)
• Directing (to Susan Forbes, associate professor of theatre)
• Scenic, lighting, and mask design (to Joe DeForest, technical director and facilities director)
• Enhancing the production (to musical director, musicians, movement coach, hair and wig designer, stage manager and crew). Associate Professor of Dance Jeanne Goddard was the production’s movement coach, and Visiting Instructor of Music Victor Penniman was the musical director. Many members of the campus community contributed their time, energy, and expertise in order to make an outstanding production.
• Costume Design (to former adjunct faculty member Judith Johnson)

Wells students who performed in the production are Lily Cavanaugh ‘04 of Ithaca, Lauren Noyes ‘05 of Albany, New York; Kjrstn Barranti ‘04 of Youngstown, Ohio; Dana Finegan ‘04 of New Oxford, Pennsylvania; Sharon Gwozdz ’04 of Cleveland, Ohio; Diana V. Gallego ‘03 of Brooklyn, New York; and Zoe Malinchoc ‘05 of Port Charles, Minnesota, who doubled as an assistant stage manager to Nandani Sinha ‘03 of Montauk, New York.

The producers report approximately 550 people saw the play.

And Some Related Theatre News…

In addition to producing and directing The Schemings of Scapin, Professor Susan Forbes also recently adapted and directed Shakespeare’s As You Like It for the Auburn Players.

This production was performed throughout Cayuga County including the Wells College Amphitheatre in August. It was awarded two Merit Awards by the Theatre Association of New York. The production was remounted on October 3-6 at Cayuga Community College as part of a Condensed Shakespeare Festival for the Auburn Players.

October, 2002

 


Fiction Writer to Read at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is pleased to bring fiction writer Jennifer Egan to campus on Wednesday, October 30. The reading will take place in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall at 8:00 pm. There is no charge, and the public is welcome to attend.

Egan is the author of the story collection The Emerald City and two novels, The Invisible Circus and, most recently, Look at Me, which was nominated for the National Book Award. The New York Times called Look at Me "truly moving" in its portrayal of her characters' struggles with identity, "that construct of internal self-worth and external regard, the shell that so unreliably binds us all." Egan has also written a series of compelling cover stories for The New York Times Magazine, including essays on gay priests, gays in the military, teenage fashion models, and young women prone to self-mutilation. Jennifer Egan is this year's Wells College Mildred Walker '26 Visiting Fiction Writer.

For more information about Jennifer Egan and the reading, please contact Cynthia Garrett at 315/364-3250 or visit the website at www.wells.edu. Members of the media may arrange an interview or photo session with the speaker by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


Natural Disasters Focus of Sculpture Exhibit at Wells College

The work of two internationally-known artists will be on display in Wells College’s String Room Gallery this fall. The show, entitled “Intensive,” begins on Wednesday, October 16 with an opening reception for the artists from 7:00 - 9:00 pm. Refreshments will be served and the public is warmly invited to attend. The exhibit runs through Friday, December 6, and is free and open to the public for viewing.

The title "Intensive" was selected by the artists as a reference to a concentrated body of material - in this case, the actuality of disasters, both human and natural, and the media’s representations of such disasters - which should be studied intensely. This installation will contain many components from previous shows presented by the artists, as well as previously unshown work. The main body of “Intensive” contains 20 monotypes of paper which reflect the visual aftermath of natural and human made disasters. It is tempting to relate this exhibit to the events of September 11. However, Ayoung and Andrade have had a long-standing interest in the definitions of disaster, and these pieces were actually created in February 2002 during an artist residency at Lafayette College in Easton, PA. In addition to the monotypes, the artists plan to include two sheetrock paintings and two floor pieces.

Carlos Andrade is a native of Colombia. Andrade earned his B.F.A. from  the University of Rhode Island. He has exhibited his work in group and solo displays in the U.S. and internationally, including Denmark, Colombia, Monaco, and France. Todd Ayoung is originally from Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. He earned his M.F.A. in Sculpture from Yale University, and has shown his work in solo and group exhibitions in the United States and in Denmark, Austria, and England.

String Room Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. while school is in session. For more information about the show and the artists, please contact art professor Bill Roberts at 315/364-3237.  Members of the media may arrange an interview or photo session with the artists by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


Solo Performance at Wells College Looks at Gender Boundaries

Wells College announces a special showing of a new play, “Ex Post Papa: Life as a Freelance Dyke Dad,” coming to campus on Friday, October 25.  The performance by transgendered Boston-based artist Bear is free and will begin at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall, on the Aurora campus. The public is warmly invited to attend. A reception and talk back will follow the show.

Solo artist Bear presents this humorous, smart, touching piece about life as a gender outlaw in the 21st century. An Ex Post Papa is the father that you find for yourself when it becomes clear that the gap where your real dad left off and where you want to be is too wide to jump. Ex Post Papas exists to help you address the things your own father never taught you or could never let you be. In this honest, upfront performance, Bear negotiates the boundaries surrounding gender and identity.

The show recently played at Emerson College in Boston, New York University, and at the National Gay/Lesbian Theatre Festival in Columbus, Ohio. It continues on to Hartford, Connecticut after a stop in Aurora. Ex Post Papa is sponsored by the Office of Student Activities, the Dean of Students Office, the Office of Intercultural Programs, the Departments of Theatre, Women’s Studies, and Psychology, LBQTA, and The Sex Collective.

For more information about Bear and Ex Post Papa, please contact Professor Vic Muñoz at 315/364-3248 or visit the website at www.wells.edu. Members of the media may arrange an interview or photo session with the artist by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


Beethoven Brings Singers Together: Local Alumnae Join in College's Choral Celebration

The incomparable Ludwig van Beethoven comes to Central New York this fall.  The Wells College Concert Choir will join the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Glee Club and a full symphonic orchestra for a performance of Beethoven’s Mass in C on Sunday, October 27, at 3:00 p.m. in the Sommer Center on the Wells campus in Aurora.  Admission is free, and the public is welcome to attend.

One hundred and seventy-five years after his death in 1827, Beethoven is hailed throughout the world one of the greatest composers of all time.  Composed in 1808 as his Opus 86, Beethoven’s middle-period Mass in C reveals the composer at the height of his creative genius and the breadth of his popular appeal.

This performance of the Mass in C, conducted by Wells Music Professor Crawford R. Thoburn, is the latest in a series of intercollegiate choral collaborations offered by the Wells Concert Choir across the northeast.

For the first time, former Wells Concert Choir members have been invited to join in a major performance on campus.  “I’m thrilled to have the chance to be a part of the Wells Choir again.  It’s such an excellent group,” says Sarah Messenger Gleason of Auburn, a member of the Class of 1988.  “I’ve missed this caliber of singing.”

 “Performing a work of this stature may be a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” says Professor Thoburn.  “We’re glad to share it with our local alumnae.”

A dozen Wells College graduates, from the Classes of 1973 through 2002, now living in Ithaca, Grotton, Syracuse, Cicero, Baldwinsville, Clay, Camillus, Moravia, Auburn, and Aurora will sing in the performance.  “Their willingness to give their time, joining us for our rehearsals, shows the impact Wells Choir membership has had in their lives,” says the choir’s current president Nandani Sinha ‘03.

Founded by Prof. Thoburn, the Wells Concert Choir includes over 10% of the student body every year, and now numbers more than 600 former members.  Many of them, like the Reverend Barbara Sterling Willson ‘73 of Syracuse, continued to sing in choral groups after leaving Wells.  “I wish we could have Wells Choir alumnae from all over the country join us to sing this great work,” says Wilson.  “It’s is a wonderful experience.”
 

October, 2002

 


Women-Empowering Textile Art on Exhibit at Wells College

Now showing in Wells College’s Long Library is a series of abstract textile portraits created by artist Noerena Abookire. This powerful installation will remain on exhibit through October 30.  Dr. Abookire will also give a talk entitled “Because I’m Your Mother: Analysis to Action” on Tuesday, October 29 at 8:00 pm in the Henry Wells Room, Long Library. She speaks on the process of looking at, healing, and celebrating the impact of messages we have received from our mothers. Both her talk and the exhibit are free and open to the public.
bookire
Because I’m Your Mother includes twenty large textile portraits which depict powerful messages that have influenced the development of today’s women. Each panel is an abstract representation of a female adorned by church hats, dress gloves, aprons, nightgowns, and swimsuits from the 1950s and 60s, mounted on drapery fabric of thick-textured, pale-pink moiré. Each of the ladies holds a kitchen towel, napkin, or handkerchief upon which is embroidered a saying that has been handed down from mother to daughter over the generations. Loaded statements such as “You don’t buy the cow if you get the milk free,” “Are you trying to make yourself as unattractive as possible?” and “Have something to eat; you’ll feel better.” verbally depict subtle and blatant messages passed along through scare tactics, threats, warnings, and genuine concerns of mothers for their daughters.

Taking her cue from the creative and resilient singer Billie Holiday, Noerena Abookire believes in the possibility of all things, as long as they are for the good of all and do no harm. Dr. Abookire is a gifted artist whose work magnifies moments in life to capture the interest of the viewer while encouraging introspection and conversation. Dr. Abookire holds a Ph.D. from New York University. She has more than 20 years experience working with students in high-risk situations in public and private schools. As artistic director and founder of the Arts Educational Theatre Company in Cleveland, she used the arts as a teaching and healing tool. She is also the founder of Creative Empowerment Workshops and serves as a consultant to a wide range of constituencies, including The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, The National Head Start Association, and the National Parks and Recreation Association. Because I’m Your Mother integrates her training as an educator, curriculum specialist, author, artist, and woman.

The Long Library hours are Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. to midnight, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday noon to 6:00 p.m., and Sunday from noon to midnight.

For more information about Dr. Abookire and Because I’m Your Mother, please contact dean of experiential learning Terry Martinez at 315/364-3404 or visit the website at www.wells.edu. Members of the media may arrange an interview or photo session with the artist by contacting Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002


Assortment of Published Poets/Writers to Read at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is most pleased to bring to campus six poets for an evening of readings and discussion. Each author has been published by FootHills Publishing. The readings will take place in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall on Thursday, October 17, at 7:30 pm. There is no charge, and the public is welcome to attend.

Philip Memmer's poems have appeared widely in journals such as Poetry, Poetry Northwest, and Southern Poetry Review. He lives in central New York, where he edits the poetry journal Two Rivers Review and directs the Downtown Writer's Center, a member of the YMCA National Writer's Voice. His chapbook, “For Resident,” was printed by FootHills Publishing this year.

Robert Darling, professor of English at Keuka College, has published two previous poetry chapbooks and the Twayne English Authors Series has published his study of the poetry of A.D. Hope. Professor Darling's poetry, reviews and essays have been published internationally in numerous magazines, reviews and journals, in print and on the web. “Breaking the Silence” was released in 2001 by FootHills Publishing.

Since graduating from college, Bill Pruitt has been a library clerk, physical therapy courier, loading dock receiver, co-manager of a co-op food store, storyteller, poet, and teacher of history and English as a second language. Born in St. Louis, he lives with his wife Pam in Rochester, New York. His latest, “Bold Cities, Golden Plains,” was published by FootHills this year.

M.J. Iuppa is a teacher, poet and frequent workshop leader for Writers & Books and is curator of the Genesee Reading Series. Her poems have been published widely in journals, anthologies, and newspapers, including Poetry, Yankee, New Letters, Press, and Tar River Poetry. She teaches poetry and creative writing at St. John Fisher College and in area schools. “Temptations” was a 2001 FootHills Publishing release.

Bruce Bennett has had four chapbooks published by FootHills Publishing: “To Be a Heron,” “I Never Danced With Mary Beth,” “Garretman,” and most recently, “Hey, Diddle Diddle.” Bruce is a professor of English at Wells College and recently served as the director of the Book Arts Center there.

Michael Czarnecki is the founder and editor of FootHills Publishing. The company is located in Kanona, New York, near the town of Bath. He started the small press in 1986 and has since published 48 chapbooks and books by over 30 poets. Michael makes his living as a poet and publisher. In the last few years he’s given well over 100 readings in more than 20 different states.

For more information about the readings, please contact Bruce Bennett at 315/364-3228 or visit the website at www.wells.edu. To arrange an interview or photo session with the poets or publisher, contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


The Afro-Brazilian Dance Company Brings High Energy Performance to Wells College

James AmpsThe Wells College Arts & Lectures Series is proud to present The Brazz Dance Theatre for one night only, Saturday, October 19, at 7:30 pm in Phipps Auditorium. The public is welcome to attend this bright and colorful presentation. Prices are $3 for students and children, $6 for seniors and the Wells community, and $10 for the general public. Tickets are available from the college bookstore or the box office the week preceding the show, and at the door the evening of the performance. Please call the box office at 315/364-3456 to reserve tickets.

The Brazz Dance Theatre of Northampton, Massachusetts, features a wild, upbeat fusion of Afro-Brazilian and contemporary dance styles. The troupe uses a broad range of music compositions, ranging from Bach to samba, to reflect rich Brazilian themes and subjects as seen through the eyes of a world traveler. The result is a vibrant piece that brings about a strong sense of embodied cultural experience mixed with human universality.

Augusto Soledade, a performer and choreographer, is also the founder and director of The Brazz Dance Theatre. A native of Bahia, Brazil, Soledade currently serves as a full time assistant professor of dance at Smith College in Massachusetts, and was a guest artist and instructor at Wells College in 1998. He received his MFA in Dance from SUNY Brockport, and has taught at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, the University of Rochester, Monroe Community College, and SUNY-Morrisville. His dance training started at the Federal University of Bahia, from which he also earned a degree in journalism. Soledade was invited to perform as a contestant for the First International Ballet and Modern Dance competition held in Japan in 1992. He has performed extensively in Brazil, Trinidad/Tobago, and throughout New York State.

For more information about Augusto Soledade and The Brazz Dance Theatre, please contact the Office of Student Activities at 315/364-3330 or visit the website at www.wells.edu. To arrange an interview or photo session with the artist or troupe, contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

October, 2002

 


Wells College Offers Flute & Harp Concert

The Music Department at Wells College is pleased to offer an evening of flute and harp music. On Monday, October 7 at 8:00 pm in Barler Recital Hall, flutist Laura Campbell and harpist Myra Kovary will present the premiere performance of local composer Laurie Conrad's "Visions" written especially for this duo. Other works on the program will include pieces by Debussy, J.S. Bach, and Faure. This concert is free and the public is cordially invited to attend.

Laura Campbell is currently instructor of chamber music at Wells College, as well as instructor of flute at Colgate University and principal flutist of the Colgate Symphony. She has performed with the Springfield (Ill.) Symphony, the St. Louis Municipal Opera Orchestra, the Ithaca Opera Orchestra, St. Louis Gateway Festival Orchestra, the Utica Symphony, and the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes. A contemporary musician, her recording of Margaret Fairlie-Kennedy's "Windrider / Final Ascent" is available on the CD "Evocations" from Capstone Records.

Myra Kovary performs as a harpist with several orchestras including the Cayuga Chamber Orchestra, the Syracuse Symphony, the Cornell University Orchestra, the Ithaca College Orchestra, the Ithaca College Wind Ensemble, the Binghamton Symphony, the Ithaca Opera Orchestra, and the Tri-Cities Opera Orchestra. She has played chamber music with faculty ensembles at Ithaca College, at Cornell University, with the Finger Lakes Chamber Ensemble, and with Pro Musica (Ithaca, N.Y.). Ms. Kovary currently maintains a private studio in Ithaca teaching both classical and folk harp.

As a duo, Campbell and Kovary have been performing together at recitals, weddings, and receptions for over twenty years. Their new CD of classical favorites, "Morning Light," has recently been released to very positive reviews. For more information about the performance, please contact Laura Campbell at 315/364-3281.

September, 2002

 


Motivational Speaker and Author at Wells College
"Remember the Titans" teammate talks about personal accountability

The Well College Office of Intercultural Programs is pleased to bring James Amps to the Aurora campus for an inspiring keynote address. On Tuesday, October 8 at 6:00 pm in Barler Auditorium, the former football player will deliver a dynamic presentation which shows individuals how to move out of comfort zones, be accountable, and achieve personal and professional success. The public is cordially invited to attend this exciting free lecture.

Amps’ presentations motivate participants to be accountable, take action, and get immediate results. A former All-American football player for T.C. Williams High School under Coach Herman Boone as portrayed in the hit movie "Remember the Titans,” Amps is a former sales and recruiting executive who has 18 years of corporate experience. He captivates his audiences with upbeat, high energy, and enthusiastic presentations spiked with a unique style that propels participants to learn how to challenge life instead of allowing life to challenge them. An inspiring speaker, trainer, and author, Amps is the host of the syndicated talk radio show, Motiviational Moments. He inspires individuals and organizations to turn obstacles into opportunities, problems into possibilities, and temporary defeat into permanent victory.

Amps will sign copies of his book following the presentation. The speaker's latest book, Speaking to Excel, will be available for purchase for $10.00. For more information about James Amps and his presentation, please contact assistant dean Carolyn Morales at 315/364-3312 or cmorales@wells.edu. To arrange an interview or photo session with the artist, contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

September, 2002

 


Poetry / Fiction Reading at Wells College

On Wednesday, October 2, and Thursday, October 3, authors Judith Kitchen and Stan Sanvel Rubin will be on the Wells College campus in Aurora to give a joint reading, attend classes, and conduct workshops in both fiction and poetry. The reading will take place at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 2 in the Art Exhibit Room on the 2nd floor of Macmillan Hall. The public is invited to this free event.

Ms. Kitchen, currently writer-in-residence at SUNY Brockport, has published prize-winning work in three genres: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Her first book, a collection of poetry entitled Perennials, won the Anhinga Prize. She has also published two volumes of creative non-fiction essays, Only the Dance and Distance and Direction, as well as co-edited two major anthologies of creative non-fiction, In Short and In Brief. Recently she won the S. Mariella Gable Prize from Greywolf Press prize for her new novel, The House on Eccles Road.  In addition, she has published a critical study on the poet William Stafford. Ms. Kitchen serves as regular poetry reviewer for the Georgia Review.

Mr. Rubin is professor of English and director of the Writers Forum at SUNY Brockport, which hosts a nationally known Writers Series and is renowned for its unparalleled archive collection of poets and fiction writers. His poems and essays have appeared widely in leading magazines, including Virginia Quarterly Review, Chelsea, Kenyon Review, Ohio Review, Laurel Review, and Georgia Review. Mr. Rubin is the author of a book of poems, Midnight, and his new chapbook, On The Coast, will be published this fall.

Copies of various printed works by the authors will be available for purchase in the Wells College bookstore and at the reading. This visit is made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information about Kitchen, Rubin, and the reading, please call 315/364-3228.

The Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers will be on campus during the academic year.

September, 2002

 


"The Legacy of Leaders": President Ryerson Writes Editorial in Celebration of the Women's College Coalition's 30th Anniversary

President Lisa Marsh Ryerson's op-ed essay "The Legacy of Leaders" celebrates the Women's College Coalition's 30th anniversary.
 

September, 2002

 


Wells College President Presides Over Women’s College Coalition 30th Anniversary

Lisa Marsh Ryerson, President Wells College, and national Chair of the Women’s College Coalition (WCC) in Washington D.C. will preside over the celebration of the Coalition’s 30th anniversary on September 24, 2002 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. At this special event the Coalition will honor sixteen women serving in the 107th Congress who attended women’s college. They will be recognized for their visionary leadership in the United States and for being outstanding examples of the legacy of women’s colleges.

“As an alumna of Wells College, I know first-hand the significant role women’s college play advancing women through the liberal arts. Women’s colleges prepare women for leadership in all aspects of their lives. This landmark event is a reminder of the importance of women’s colleges in our nation’s history and their necessity in the higher education landscape today. These women represent some of our best and brightest graduates. I am proud to preside over a celebration in their honor,” said Ryerson.

Being honored at the WCC 30th anniversary celebration is:

The Honorable Tammy Baldwin (WI)    Smith College, MA
The Honorable Donna M. Christian-Christensen (VI) St. Mary’s College, IN
The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton (NY)  Wellesley College, MA
The Honorable Rosa DeLauro (CT)    Marymount College, NY
The Honorable Jane Harman (CA)    Smith College, MA
The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX)   St. Mary’s College, IN
The Honorable Nancy L. Johnson (CT)   Radcliffe College, MA
The Honorable Sue W. Kelly (NY)    Sarah Lawrence College, NY
The Honorable Barbara Lee, (CA)    Mills College, CA
The Honorable Blanche L. Lincoln (AR)    Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, VA
The Honorable Nita M. Lowey (NY)     Mount Holyoke, MA
The Honorable Betty McCollum (MN)   College of St. Catherine, MN
The Honorable Barbara Mikulski (MD)   Mount Saint Agnes College, MD
The Honorable Patsy Mink (HI)  University of Hawaii & Wilson College Pennsylvania
The Honorable Ann M. Northrup (KY)  Saint Mary’s College, IN
The Honorable Nancy Pelosi (CA) Trinity College, DC, First woman elected as Democratic whip on the House of Representatives, highest post ever held by a woman in congress

Lisa Marsh Ryerson is the 17th president of Wells College. Known as a national leader in women’s education and the liberal arts, she is one of the youngest college presidents serving today and is the first alumna president of Wells. Ryerson is known as an inspirational speaker, who discusses and writes about the benefits of women’s colleges, women-centered education, gender equality in education and society, women in leadership and business/education partnerships.

As the Chair of the Women’s College Coalition in Washington D.C., Ryerson leads an association board of directors representing 70 women’s college in the United States and Canada. Its current membership includes 62 colleges, including public and private, independent and church-related and two year and four year colleges.

The Coalition makes the case for single–sex education for women in the higher education community to policy makers, to the media and to the general public. Additionally, the Coalition collects and disseminates information and sponsors research in areas relating to the education of women and gender equity in education.

Other priority areas are the issues of retention and recruitment of women into math, science, and engineering, and the development of women’s leadership in society. The nation’s 70 women’s’ colleges are located in 23 states and the District of Columbia.

September, 2002

 


Wells College Names First Assistant Dean for Intercultural Programs and Services

Carolyn J. Morales has been named Assistant Dean of Students for Intercultural Programs and Services at Wells College. In this capacity she joins the staff of the college’s Student Life division.

At Wells Morales will provide leadership for the development of educational, cultural, and social programs that enhance intercultural understanding and foster a campus climate that celebrates and respects the uniqueness of all its members. In addition, she will serve as an advocate for students from diverse racial, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds, religious and sexual orientations, and works cooperatively with admissions, faculty and administration to build and strengthen support networks and to increase and retain representation in historically underrepresented groups.

Before joining the Wells College student affairs staff in August, she was Director of Multicultural Affairs at Elizabethtown College in Pennsylvania where she served as a liaison between students, administration, and the local community. She successfully created, developed, and implemented diversity plans, training programs, and inclusive multicultural programs.

Morales advised and mentored many student organizations including Elizabethtown’s Asian Cultural Association, Colors United, Allies, Womenspeak, Interfaith Dialogue, and International Clubs. She also worked with faculty members to design cultural programs including Hispanic Heritage Month, National Coming Out Month, Rosh Hashanah, Black History Month and National Disability Month.

“Teaching and learning should not be bound by categories of ‘in’ or ‘outside’ the classroom,” said Karen Green, Wells College Dean of Students. “All aspects of teaching and learning at Wells must promote and support our mission to educate women in the liberal arts and prepare students for leadership and service to society. I am pleased to welcome Carolyn Morales to the Student Life division of Wells College. I know she will make many positive contributions to building a true learning community on our campus.”

September, 2002

 


Wells College Partners with Cornell for Environmental Film Screening & Discussion

Filmmaker Emily Hart will be on the Wells College campus on Tuesday evening, October 8 for a showing of her movie depicting the plight of the Northern Spotted owl. The screening will take place at 8:00 pm in the Sommer Center as part of Cornell’s 6th Annual Environmental Film Festival. The event is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Ms. Hart will host a screening of her film “The God Squad and the Case of the Northern Spotted Owl.” The documentary investigates the controversial Endangered Species Committee’s proceedings focusing on the impact of the Oregon timber industry on the habitat of the endangered owl. In May of 1992, for the first time in history, the cabinet-level committee selected economic interests over the survival of a species. While the proceedings ostensibly focused on the owl and a limited number of timber sales, the controversy was a microcosm of a much larger debate concerning the fate of the Pacific Northwest’s old growth forests and the Endangered Species Act. The story-behind-the-story, as told in surprisingly candid interviews with President Bush’s cabinet members, their staff, witnesses, lawyers, and the people of Oregon’s rural communities, is a fascinating cautionary tale for generations to come.

For more information about Emily Hart and the screening, please call 315/364-3279. To arrange for a possible interview with the filmmaker, contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

The Cornell Center for the Environment (CfE) is committed to research, teaching, and outreach focused on environmental issues, with the goals of enhancing the quality of life, encouraging economic vitality, and promoting the conservation of natural resources for a sustainable future. Information about the Environmental Film Festival may be found at www.cfe.cornell.edu/filmfest.

September, 2002

 


Welsh Poet / Printer To Read at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series is most pleased to welcome poet and printer Shirley Jones all the way from the United Kingdom. On Monday, September 23, Ms. Jones will present a slide lecture and read from her recent work. The reading will be held at 8:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall, and is free and open to the public.

For more than 25 years, Shirley Jones’ Red Hen Press, located in Powys, Wales, has been creating limited edition letterpress books that present poetry and prose in concert with etchings and mezzotints. Each of Jones’ books is a total concept - the choice of paper and typeface, the unity of text and images, and the harmony of the binding are all as carefully considered as the visual and literary creativity involved. Her work has received critical acclaim and is now collected by rare book libraries and private collectors in several countries. Jones studied printmaking at the Croydon College of Art and Design, and taught in London for several years before naming her own press in 1983. She now lives and works in Wales, and lectures extensively. She has won several awards, including the 1994 British Book Design Award.

Copies of various Red Hen Press works will be available for purchase in the Wells College bookstore. Ms. Jones’ visit is made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information about Shirley Jones, the Red Hen Press, and the reading, please call 315/364-3228. To arrange an interview or photo session with the artist, contact Gwen Webber-McLeod, director of communications, at 315/364-3260.

The Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers will be on campus during the academic year.

September, 2002

 


Visiting Poet Reading at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series welcomes poet Charles Martin to campus. On Wednesday, September 25, Mr. Martin will read selections from his latest book "Starting From Sleep: New and Selected Poems." The reading will take place at 8:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall, and is free and open to the public.

Charles Martin is the author of four books of poems, including "Steal The Bacon" and "What The Darkness Proposes," both published by the Johns Hopkins University Press and both nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. His translation of the poems of Catullus has also been published by Johns Hopkins, and his critical introduction to the Latin poet’s work appears as one of the volumes in the Yale University Press’s Hermes Series.

Martin’s poems have appeared in Poetry, The New Yorker, The Hudson Review, Boulevard, The Threepenny Review, and in many other magazines and anthologies. He is the recipient of a Bess Hokin Award from Poetry, a 2001 Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from the Ingram Merrill Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is a professor at Queensborough Community College (CUNY) and has recently taught workshops at the Sewanee Writers Conference, the West Chester Conference on Form and Narrative in Poetry, and the Unterberg Center of the 92nd Street YMHA. "Starting From Sleep" was published in March 2002, from Sewanee Writers’ Series/The Overlook Press, and a new verse translation of the "Metamorphoses of Ovid" will be published next year by W.W. Norton and Co.

Copies of "Starting From Sleep" will be available for purchase in the Wells College bookstore and at the reading. Mr. Martin’s visit is made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information about Charles Martin and the reading, please call 315/364-3228. To arrange to meet with the poet, please contact director of communications, Gwen Webber-McLeod at 315/364-3260.

The Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers will be on campus during the academic year.

September, 2002

 


Third Annual Peachtown Native American Festival and Education Day at Wells College

In collaboration with Wells College’s Office of Intercultural Programs and Services, Peachtown Elementary School, and local community members, S.H.A.R.E. (Strengthening Haudenosaunee-American Relations through Education) is proud to announce the third annual Peachtown Native American Festival and Education Day on Saturday, September 28. The festival will be held from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on the front lawn of Main Building on the beautiful Wells College campus in Aurora. The event is free and the public is invited to join in the fun.

Russell Ges ton joh Smith, a Haudenosaunee performer, will serve as Master of Ceremonies this year.  Ges ton joh is fluent in both powwow style and Iroquois social dancing and has won numerous awards for his performances in Canada and the United States.  A craftsman as well as a musician, Russell records stories of Iroquois history and legends in his beadwork patterns. He will be accompanied by the Onkwehonwe Unity Dancers.

Another highlight of the festival will be the presence of the Thunder Lizard Singers drum group, represented by members of the Laguna Pueblo/Navajo, Cherokee/Kickapoo/ Lakota, Mohawk, and Cree Nations. The Thunder Lizard Singers bring songs from the Plains, pueblos and the Diné as well as Southeastern-style Stomp Dance songs.  In addition to traditional powwow singing, the group will also perform original songs accompanied by rattles, hand drums, chants and Native American flute as influenced by their various tribal backgrounds.

Dan Hill, another featured artist, is perhaps best known for his recordings of Native American flute music.  Hill is an accomplished musician and live performer whose credits include film and television appearances.  He has become a much sought-after lecturer, storyteller and teacher, and has traveled extensively across North America and beyond. Dan Hill makes flutes and is a talented silversmith who specializes in traditional Iroquois and exquisite original designs.

Other festival participants include Lillie Kane, who will share indigenous stories while conducting a Seneca corn doll workshop; Mike Tarbell, a Mohawk, who will perform bow and atlatl demonstrations; herbalists Jeanne Shenandoah and Otat Homer who will offer plant and medicinal material demonstrations; and Rick Hill, Tuscarora tribal member, who will offer a special educational exhibit with wampum and treaty belts.  Educational displays and exhibits including the archaeology of the Cayuga homeland will be available for the public to view.  Special Native foods will be offered as well as social dances.

For more information regarding the festival or S.H.A.R.E., please contact Wells anthropology professor Ernie Olson at 315/364-3206 or by email at eolson@wells.edu

September, 2002

 


Chinese Political Discussion and Poetry Reading at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series and the Division of Social Sciences welcomes Chinese dissident poet Yi Ping to campus on Wednesday, September 18. Ping will lead a discussion on Chinese politics in a question-and-answer forum at 4:30. At 7:30 pm, he will read selections from his poems in Chinese with translation in English. Both events will be held in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall. The public is invited to participate in these free discussions.

Yi Ping is a Chinese dissident essayist and poet presently living in Ithaca on a two-year residency with the City of Asylum program (ICOA). ICOA is a not-for-profit project affiliated with Cornell’s Center for Religion, Ethics, and Social Policy which supports writers whose works are repressed, whose lives are threatened, whose cultures are vanishing, and/or whose languages are endangered. Yi Ping, who is exiled from China because of his participation in democracy activism, will spend two years in Ithaca with his family. ICOA strives to create a safe haven in which the writer can live peacefully.

The Wells College Book Arts Center will be hand-printing a broadside in honor of Yi Ping’s presence on campus. The broadside will be available for purchase at the reading. Ping’s visit is made possible in part by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts. For more information about Yi Ping, the political discussion, or the poetry reading, please call 315/364-3228. ICOA information can be found at www.saltonstall.org/icoa/

The Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers have been invited to speak on campus during the academic year.

September, 2002

 


Abstract Paintings on Exhibit at Wells College

The abstract paintings of two upstate New York artists will be on display in Wells College’s String Room Gallery this fall. This is the first exhibit of the academic year. The show begins on Wednesday, September 11 with an opening reception for the artists from 7:00 - 9:00 pm. Refreshments will be served and the public is warmly invited to attend. The exhibit runs through Friday, October 11, and is free and open to the public for viewing.

Kathryn Gaspar, a painter from Victor, New York, will be presenting her latest work from a series entitled “Cards.” The series focuses on small drawings of repetitive geometric figures done on die-cut cards with silver ink.  “I’ve always loved to collect and send art cards,” explains artist Gaspar. “These cards are miniature artworks you can hold in your hand and look at closely.”  The artist received her BS in Studio Art from SUNY-Brockport and her masters in art education from Nazareth College. Gaspar has been an art instructor in several school systems in the Rochester area, and has exhibited her work throughout central New York.

Isaac Sands of Oneonta, New York, holds a BA in Art from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an MFA from Yale.  Last year he was the artist-in-residence at Hartwick College in Oneonta, and he has taught at various schools in the Northeast and the Midwest. His paintings have been exhibited in central New York, Connecticut, Indiana, New Hampshire, and San Francisco.

String Room Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. while school is in session. For more information about the show and the artists, please contact art professor Bill Roberts at 315/364-3237.
 

September, 2002

 


Wells College Students Present Comedy by Moliere

The Wells College Theatre Department proudly presents Moliere’s The Schemings of Scapin as this fall’s student drama production. The comedy will be featured on Friday, September 13 and Saturday, September 14 beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Phipps Auditorium, Macmillan Hall on the Aurora campus.

The Schemings of Scapin is one of Moliere's most clever comedies, a visually stunning production set in 16th century Italy and performed in the style of the commedia dell'arte troupes. Lush bold colors and textures come alive in this play brilliantly translated by Tim Mooney. The farce takes you along as Scapin, the schemer, dupes two pompous dull-witted wealthy gentlemen of their money, all while managing to convince them to approve the marriages of their children’s choice. Slapstick, pratfalls, and physical comedy prevail in this romping roller coaster ride.

Scapin is directed by Wells theatre professor Susan Forbes, with scenery and lights by technical director Joe DeForest and costumes by Judith Johnson of Ithaca. Movement style is handled by Wells professor of dance, Jeanne Goddard, who heads up the CRS Barn Studio of Ithaca.

Featured in the role of Scapin is New York actor, Brian Monahan. Monahan, a graduate of the Trinity Repertory Conservatory, has had such roles as Angel in Trinity Repertory Company’s The Cider House Rules, Caliban in The Tempest at the Serpent Child Ensemble, Renfield in Dracula at The Little Theatre of Virginia Beach, and Topper in A Christmas Carol directed by Hangar Theatre’s Kevin Moriarity.

Regional actor Lesley Kennedy of Skaneateles will be seen in the role of Hyacinthe. Darlynne Stefanko of Ithaca trained under Forbes at Wells and is featured as Scapin’s sidekick, Sylvester. Ithaca College student Kim Dulchinos is dashing as the smitten lover, Octave.

Wells College students comprise the rest of the cast: Lily Cavanaugh of Ithaca is the self-centered father, Argante. Lauren Noyes of Albany plays the blustering fool father, Geronte. Kjrstn Barranti of Youngstown, Ohio feigns as the foppish lover, Leandre. Dana Finegan of New Oxford, PA, is saucy as the clever gypsy girl, Zerbinette. Sharon Gwozdz of Cleveland is seen as Carle, the dull-witted, stuttering servant. Diana V. Gallego of Brooklyn is the sexy and coy servant, Nerine. Zoe Malinchoch of Port Charles, Minnesota is lusciously long and lanky as the drunken porter and doubles as an assistant stage manager to Nandani Sinha of Montauk, NY.

Advance tickets are available from the box office beginning September 1 by calling 315/364-3456, by emailing boxoffice@wells.edu, or at the door the night of the show. Prices are $3 for students and senior citizens, $5 for the Wells community, $7 general public. For more information about the production, please contact professor Susan Forbes at 315/364-3232 or sforbes@wells.edu.

August, 2002

 


One Year Later, Photo Exhibit and Lecture at Wells College Focuses on the World Trade Center

The Rise and Fall of the World Trade Center is the focus of artist Vince Grimaldi’s upcoming talk and photography exhibit at Wells College. The exhibition will be on display in the Long Library beginning September 9 and running through September 30. Grimaldi will also give a lecture at 7:00 pm on Tuesday, September 10 in the Art Exhibit Room, Macmillan Hall, on the Aurora campus. A reception for the artist will follow in the library. Refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Intentionally scheduled to coincide with the one-year anniversary of the September 11 tragedies, the exhibit displays poignant images and captivating photographs of the Twin Towers before their demolition. Taken years before the attacks, Grimaldi “never thought they would be used in a show this way. I liked the way they looked juxtaposed, gleaming against some of the older buildings.”

Grimaldi, a New Yorker at heart, studied at the Art Students League in Manhattan before being drafted to Korea in 1951. Following the war, he enrolled in The New School to study photography, then did a three-year stint in Rome showing his work in local galleries. He returned to New York in 1967 and continued with his photography work, focusing on New York landmarks. Grimaldi moved to Providence in 1995.
 

In addition to his photographs, Grimaldi also paints and does box constructions and collages. His work hangs in the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, as well as the Tate Gallery in London. A portion of the proceeds from the World Trade Center shows go to St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Manhattan, completely destroyed when Tower 2 collapsed a year ago.

The Long Library hours are Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. to midnight, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday noon to 6:00 p.m., and Sunday from noon to midnight. For more information about Vince Grimaldi and the exhibit or talk, please contact professor Susan Forbes at 315/364-3232 or sforbes@wells.edu.

August, 2002

 

Human Rights Advocate Will Give Wells Commencement Address

Frances “Sissy” Tarlton Farenthold, one of the most dynamic and inspiring woman political figures in the United States to emerge in the post-World War II Era, will give the Commencement Address at Wells College on Saturday, May 25. The ceremony begins at 10:00 a.m. outside Macmillan Hall.

Throughout her career, spanning numerous political and social shifts, Farenthold has remained an unwavering a champion of human rights and dignity. In particular, she has been a forceful advocate for the attainment of gender equity – even when her views did not necessarily guarantee votes and public popularity. Her commitment continues today.

While her contributions are numerous, she already has a permanent place in history as a pioneer who opened the door for women’s leadership in the America political system. She was a delegate to the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami and was nominated for Vice President of the United States by Gloria Steinem, among others. It was the first time a woman’s name had ever been brought forth in that capacity. Ultimately, Missouri Senator Thomas Eagelton received the highest number of votes, and Farenthold was second; but history was changed.

Farenthold has been involved in public affairs at the local, state, national, and international levels. Over three decades, she has served as a human rights observer in Iraq, El Salvador, Honduras, South Korea, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Cuba, and the former Soviet Union.

In 1991, she met with the president of the U.N. Security Council and in 1985 with Mikhail Gorbachev. She has testified before four committees of the U.S. House of Representatives on topics including daycare, campaign finance reform, and the situation of migrant workers.

She is a co-founder and the first chair of the National Women’s Political Caucus and served on the board of the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. for the past 20 years. In 1988, she was a delegate to the Platform Committee of the Democratic National Convention and in 1984 served as a delegate in the national convention.

Farenthold has been interviewed extensively in the media by PBS and CNN as well as the major networks. A film, Farenthold, was made about her life and career, and she appeared in a documentary interview with Studs Terkel in a Bill Moyers series. Articles and guest columns she wrote have been published in USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and Redbook, among others.

A native Texan, she graduated from Vassar College and then attended the University of Texas Law School as one of three women in a student body of 800. Her years working in the legal profession gave her a firsthand view of poverty and other social problems, which shaped her beliefs and compelled her to enter politics.

In 1968, she gained a seat in the Texas legislature, taking a bold pro-choice stand on abortion in the conservative climate of Texas politics. Her fearless stand on the issues enabled her to revolutionize politics and brought her into the national spotlight.

She served as the 13th president of Wells from 1976-80 and was the first woman to be named the college’s president since its founding in 1868. As Wells' president, she declared women's colleges have a special responsibility to educate women for leadership roles.

Among her many contributions to the college, she founded the Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) in Washington, D.C. This organization, still thriving today, advocates for the increased representation of women in public office.  PLEN is a consortium of women’s colleges and seeks to achieve its goals primarily by offering women educational opportunities in politics, service, and leadership studies. Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson currently serves as chair of PLEN’s executive board.

Today, Farenthold continues to speak, write, travel, and serve in order to continue her advocacy for democracy and equality. She received the Lyndon Baines Johnson Lifetime Achievement Award from the Texas Democratic Party in 1998 and is board chair of the Rothko Chapel in Houston.

May, 2002

 


Printing Collection “Worthy of the Smithsonian” Finds New Home in Wells College’s Book Arts Center

Wells College has received a large and unique collection of 19th century type along with other printer’s items and library materials from the estate of Robert Greenlee of Calumet, Michigan, according to Amy Robinson, Wells’ director of campaign development

The Greenlee Type Collection, valued at nearly $60,000, was given to Wells by Mr. Greenlee’s widow, Eloise, for use in the Book Arts Center. “The gift consists of several hundred fonts of rare type and over 1,000 ‘dingbats’ or typographic ornaments,” said Robert Doherty, a member of the Book Arts Center Board of Advisors and friend of Mr. and Mrs. Greenlee.

“My husband always said a printing shop is a college for those who work there. He was a person who enjoyed words and sayings and searched for just the proper word at all times and would tell others about each word as a means of better communications,” said Eloise Greenlee.

The Wells Book Arts Center, established in 1993, provides a broad learning opportunity for students in the art and craft of making and publishing books. “Access to the Greenlee collection will introduce our students to Bob Greenlee’s creative vision and passion for printing. They will also have more hands-on opportunities to learn about printing and the history of the book,” said Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson.

Victor Hammer Fellow Terry Chouinard, who teaches in the Book Arts Center, agrees the gift will create new opportunities for students. He also believes the collection will add to the growing stature of the center.  “We appreciate this gift enormously. It is a collection worthy of the Smithsonian,” he said.

Robert Greenlee’s career in printing began in Central Ohio. He eventually acquired a small newspaper in Idaho and then another in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Upon retirement, he founded the Gay Nineties Press, which was, according to Mr. Greenlee, “dedicated to preserving the ancient and honorable craft of letterpress printing.”

In addition to being a printer and collector, Mr. Greenlee was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and an accomplished musician who played with the Tex Beneke Big Band in the 1940s.

“His skill and craftsmanship was of the highest I have encountered in more than 60 years of printing. His collection of printing types and literature is unrivaled anywhere and a great legacy for future generations,” said Doherty.
 

May, 2002

 


Renewing A Jewel Among Finger Lakes Communities:

An Open Letter to Residents of the Village of Aurora and the Wells College Community

On March 15, the State Supreme Court Appellate Division in Rochester, New York, issued a ruling in favor of the village and the college regarding the plan to renovate the historic Aurora Inn.

The judges "unanimously affirmed" the good work done by Aurora’s elected officials, village trustees, the planning board, and other committees involved in the approval process. Their decision upheld Judge Contiguglia’s earlier ruling that the village and the college complied fully with Aurora zoning laws and the State Environmental Quality Review Act. The judges confirmed the claims made to the contrary by a small number of opponents were "wholly without merit."

On behalf of Wells College, I congratulate village leaders for their excellent stewardship and attention to process on the Aurora Inn project. Thanks to their integrity, dedication, and competence, the final outcome was never in doubt as the case moved through the judicial system.

A vocal minority stated their concerns; and these concerns were heard in the village, in the press, and in the courts. This process is necessary in a democratic society as is serving the common good. The village and the college will now move forward in partnership to continue the revitalization of Aurora.

This represents a true win-win for Aurora and Wells College. Wells and the people of Aurora are working together to create a renaissance in the village. The decision allows us to move forward with our plans to assure the historic Aurora Inn is once again the center of the community and to enhance the beauty that makes Aurora a jewel among Finger Lakes communities. In recent years, the impact of economic stagnation – a challenge to many similar communities – has visibly changed the Aurora environment. We are seeing early signs that our collective work is already reversing the decline.

Many heroes emerged during the process who have not received the public recognition they deserve. Local business owners, village residents who are not elected officials, and former village residents who now live far away, and Wells alumnae, joined together to support revitalization of the inn and the community. They remain united in their love for the village and their vision for the future. They believe in respect for the past; however, their actions indicate they do not believe we must live in the past and sacrifice the quality of life of future generations.

I believe Aurora can retain her unique identity as an historic Finger Lakes village and also provide economic prosperity for residents. I know a healthy village that can provide increased retail and social opportunities for students and their families is essential to the success of Wells College.

I thank Pleasant T. Rowland for her singular generosity and unwavering commitment to this project. Her appreciation of Aurora’s history and culture along with her practical knowledge of what a small village needs for economic survival in the 21st century is another essential part of the partnership.

We will continue to develop plans to restore each of our college-owned properties and strengthen the village economy. We look forward to reopening the inn in 2003.

Sincerely,

Lisa Marsh Ryerson
President
Wells College

March, 2002

 


Senegalese poet reads at Wells College

The Wells College Visiting Writer Series welcomes distinguished Senegalese poet Amadou Lamine Sall to campus. On Wednesday, March 27, Monsieur Sall will read a selection of poems in French with English translation provided by James Haenlin. The reading begins at 8:00 pm in the Art Exhibit Room in Macmillan Hall, and is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

M. Sall will read from his Selection of poems from Kamandalu. This collection is to be published by the Wells College Press in a bilingual edition, with translation by James and Lydie Haenlin, professor of French at Wells College. This printing marks the first time this renowned poet has been published in the United States.

One of the most prominent African poets today, Sall mentors under Leopold Sedar Senghor, and is widely published in West Africa, France, Belgium and Canada. Sall’s latest book of poetry, Les veines sauvages, was published last July in Paris by Le Corbet.

M. Sall has written that “to be a poet is to be everywhere without permission,” a statement that he actively supports. He is the founder and president of the Maison de la Poésie in Dakar, and director of the Feu de Brousse publishing company. As an adviser to the Minister of Culture in Senegal, he works tirelessly to promote poetry and the arts in school curricula. As part of his duties at the Ministry, he oversees the realization of the Gorée Memorial Project, a UNESCO-sponsored memorial to the African diaspora during the slave trade.

This event is supported in part by a special grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, which provided funds for Professor Haenlin to translate into English the poetry of M. Sall.

For more information about M. Sall and the reading, please call Professor Haenlin at 315/364-3308.

The Visiting Writer Series is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts, the Virginia Kent Cummins Writers-in-Residence Fund, and the Mildred Walker Fiction-Writer-in-Residence Fund. Several writers are invited to campus each academic year.

March, 2002

 


Birds in Art exhibit takes flight at Wells College

Birds in Art, a nationally recognized art exhibit featuring birds and habitats from around the world, lifts off at Wells College on March 6. The exhibition remains on display in the String Room Gallery through April 30. An opening reception was held on Wednesday, March 6 from 7:00 - 9:00 pm.

The selection of 60 original paintings, drawings, mixed media, and sculpture comprising half of the entire collection has been created by artists hailing from as far afield as Australia, Canada, England, France, Italy, Kenya, The Netherlands, Sweden, Taiwan, and the United States. The traveling exhibit boasts a wide range of perspectives within its singular focus on birds.

Birds in Art has been organized by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin, and is on loan to Wells College through the generosity of alumna Alice Woodson Smith, Wells class of 1970.

 “We are very fortunate to have this well-known exhibit on campus,” says Amy Robinson, director of campaign development at Wells College. “Birds in Art offers the entire Wells community and the public an opportunity to explore birds and the various mediums in which they are presented. We are particularly grateful to Joseph and Alice Woodson Smith for their support in bringing this wonderful exhibition to Wells.”

In addition to organizing the exhibit, the Woodson Museum also sponsored a Wells intern at its location in Wisconsin. Shannon Lozier of Rumney, New Hampshire, served as a summer intern in 2001 assisting with special events and the daily running of the museum. “This internship was a great opportunity to learn about the in-depth workings of an art museum,” says Lozier, who will graduate in May with a B.A. in Art History.

Following the exhibition’s close at Wells College on April 30, the show will move to the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, California.

“Birds in Art has presented a unique opportunity for collaboration between the Woodson Museum, Wells College, an alumna, and a current student,” Robinson shares. “Shannon has taken the hands-on experience she gained while working for the museum last summer and used it here at Wells. She has been instrumental in the coordination and actual hanging of the show.”

String Room Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday evenings from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information about Birds in Art, please contact art professor and gallery director William Roberts at 315/364-3237 or wroberts@wells.edu.

March, 2002

 


Wells students enjoy new service learning options

During the fall semester at Wells, dean of experiential learning Terry Martinez worked with faculty and staff to broaden learning options for students that link service, experience, and academics. As a result, Wells students participated in four off-campus study options offered during January Term 2002 that explored contemporary issues:

The Immigrant Journey. To learn about the immigrant experience in America, 12 students traveled to New York City with associate professor of English Linda Lohn. Destinations included Ellis Island, the United Nations, and the Lower East Side Tenament Museum, as well as immigrant communities in Chinatown and Little Italy. President Lisa Marsh Ryerson hosted a dinner for the Wells women at the Cornell Club.

MADRE Organization Delegation to Cuba. Wells student Margaret Irving and associate professor of political science Nan DiBello were part of the MADRE organization’s delegation to Cuba, designed to teach participants about Cuba's public health system, which is highly praised despite persistent shortages of medicine resulting from the U.S. embargo. The delegation visited Santiago de Cuba, home to many Cubans of African descent, to study the island's diverse cultures.

Southwest Florida's Pioneering Spirit. Professor of religion and philosophy Jenny Yates took seven students to Naples, Florida. They focused their studies on the area's Native American heritage. They also visited museums and gained hands-on experience working with diverse populations by volunteering at an adult daycare center in the city and a soup kitchen in a rural farming community. Wells alumnae Sis Van Dorn Grace '69, in the spirit of the Wells Connection, held a potluck for the group.

Faith, Public Policy, and World Religions.  Visiting assistant professor of religion David Reis took three students to Washington, DC, to learn about religious traditions. Topics they explored included how Christians and other people of conscience respond to social justice issues. In addition to visiting numerous religious institutions, the Christian Coalition, and the People for the American Way, participants also performed community service activities. Deb Cotter '90 held a reception for the class and other Wells students studying or doing internships in the Washington area.

Dean Martinez visited students and professors in New York City, Naples, and Washington to learn firsthand how these new experiences enrich the Wells curriculum.

For more information about experiential learning at Wells College, please contact Dean Martinez at 315/364-3404.

March, 2002

 


Wells College highlights restoration details of historic inn

The restoration of the Aurora Inn, a project undertaken by Wells College as part of an effort to strengthen the economy of the village of Aurora, will be the focus of oral argument in the State Supreme Court Appellate Division in Rochester on Monday, February 25.

A lawsuit against the college and the village of Aurora was filed last fall by the Aurora Coalition, a small group of villagers, college professors, and alumnae who object to the project. Although the lawsuit was dismissed in November by Acting State Supreme Court Justice Robert Contiguglia who ruled that their claims were "wholly without merit," the group has continued to challenge the project.

According to Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson, "From the beginning, the goal of this restoration project has been to retain and enhance the original character of the historic Inn, while making it comfortable, attractive, and accessible for all. When it reopens in the spring of 2003, the Inn will once again be the heart of our community and the focal point of this lovely historic village."

The project is funded by the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation. Ms. Rowland, an alumna of Wells College, has been involved in the preservation and restoration of many historic properties throughout the United States. "Early pictures of the village inspired us to return the Inn to its original 1833 Federalist design. While the Inn will have all the amenities contemporary visitors expect, its great appeal will be the warmth and charm inherent in this historic structure, which we have gone to great lengths to protect."

Detailed explanations and plans for the Inn have been part of the public record since last spring. Work on the Aurora Inn began in January when additions to the rear of the building made in 1904 and 1958 were removed, highlighting its original Federal architecture. Among the historic elements the renovated Aurora Inn will feature are:

Central entry hall: The Inn’s spectacular location on Cayuga Lake has always been part of its appeal. Access to lake views will now be enhanced. The original central entry hall, traditional to Federal-style buildings, has been retained. With the removal of the prior additions, the central hall will now feature a view to the lake as one enters the building, just as it did in 1833 when the Inn was built.

Porches and balconies: The Inn’s front porch and second floor balcony will be replaced, and a third floor balcony will be added, replicating the original 19th century facade. The balconies on the rear of the building, removed almost 100 years ago, will be restored. These balconies open off guest rooms, providing breathtaking views and a comfortable private space in which to take in the sunset.

Comfortable accommodations: When the project is completed there will be 10 guest rooms, greatly improved in terms of comfort and aesthetics. Two suites on the fourth floor will have lake views and will feature kitchenettes, sitting areas, and whirlpool tubs. Four other rooms will have views of the lake, four will have working fireplaces, eight will have balcony access, and all will have well-appointed marble bathrooms.

Gracious dining: With its panoramic view of the lake, the Aurora Inn’s dining room and its new enclosed porch will be able to seat 75 guests. A cocktail lounge, open to the dining room, will seat another 25. A terrace overlooking the lake, capable of seating more than 75 people, will be added for outdoor dining in the summer months. The spacious banquet room on the lower level will open to a new lakeside patio for wedding receptions, private parties, and community events.

Rediscovered fireplaces: The Inn will have a total of eight working fireplaces when completed, four of which are on the first floor in the reception area, parlor, dining room, and bar. Three of the original fireplaces had been bricked-in during previous remodeling efforts, including one that was covered by an oven in the old kitchen.

Historic portraits: Four 19th century oil paintings by noted artist Charles Loring Elliott have been located and will be restored to hang above the fireplaces on the first floor of the Inn. They depict members of the Eagles family who owned and managed the Inn during the 1840s and 1850s. One of the family members, John Eagles (1783-1855), was a former sea captain (he holds a telescope in his portrait) who ran an inn across Cayuga Lake at Ovid before moving to the Aurora Inn.

Valuable mural: Since 1958, guests at the Inn have been greeted in the entry hallway by a mural painted by Cleveland artist Glen Shaw that depicts life in Aurora during the 1880s. The mural has been cleaned and will be rehung in the banquet room.

Replicated woodwork: Although much of the Inn’s original woodwork had been removed or altered over the years, some of it was intact and will remain in the building. Using these original pieces as prototypes, the original woodwork design will be replicated throughout the Inn. The existing wooden fireplace mantels have been saved and will be reinstalled. The missing mantels will be replicated based on those that exist.

Life safety and comfort: The Inn will be handicap accessible and compliant with all life-safety requirements. An elevator will be installed. The Inn will be centrally air conditioned throughout.

New market: A new market building adjacent to the Inn will be built in keeping with the original Vanderipe building that was razed. The building will house a market, a new kitchen for the Inn, and office space for staff on the second floor.

When the Inn first opened in 1833, the following editorial was published in the Auburn paper, The Journal:

AURORA HOUSE. During a short excursion a few days since, we had the good fortune to call at the Aurora House. We say, the good fortune, for it did our hearts good to witness the regularity, neatness and order everywhere exhibited - as well as the thousand little attentions which are paid to the comfort and convenience of travelers. Of the Village of Aurora it is unnecessary for us to say a word: It is known to our readers as one of the most delightful little retreats to be found in this section of the country - affording scenery unrivalled for its beauty; and from its situation in the midst of a rich, healthy and flourishing territory, possessing almost every advantage that could be desired - and we doubt not = the traveling community will give their most hearty approval of the present most laudable enterprise, by taking this lovely village in their route. This building is situated near the bank of the Cayuga Lake, and from its several balconies on the west, furnishes an uninterrupted view of water scenery of the most enchanting kind. It has but recently been opened - and furnished throughout in a style of neatness and elegance scarcely surpassed by the most extensive houses of our large towns.


* * * * * * *

Background on Aurora’s Historic Inn

In 19th century America, village inns were the center of community life. While most towns have lost these social centers as well as a sense of place, the Aurora Inn has served its traditional role throughout the 20th century.

Until recently, the Aurora Inn was a place for village residents to gather with friends and exchange news. They celebrated their weddings and birthdays there - it was an essential part of everyday life. In the past, travelers in the Finger Lakes region found comfortable lodgings, fine dining, and experienced the charm, hospitality, and culture of a region rich in history whose people had a proud memory of their past and hope for the future.

Since Wells College opened in 1868, the Aurora Inn had been a part of collegiate life, providing a center for faculty and students to gather and accommodations and dining for parents and other college visitors. In the late 1960s, when residence halls were overcrowded, Wells students lived at the Inn. While many college towns have, at best, strained relationships between the community and academy, villagers and students were all part of the Aurora community. The Inn had a key role in creating this harmony.

In recent years, however, the Aurora Inn, owned by Wells since 1943, had suffered significant losses and had fallen into disrepair due to a lack of investment capital needed to make necessary improvements. After a number of unsuccessful attempts to provide new management, the Inn closed in the fall of 2000. It appeared a cherished tradition and an important source of economic activity for the small village would not survive into the 21st century.

The darkened and dilapidated Inn stood as an ominous symbol that Aurora, like so many historic villages, was in decline. As Wells made changes and improvements on campus to attract and retain the best students, it became clear to college leaders that a thriving village was necessary to ensure a bright future for the college. Since Wells owns more than half of the commercial properties in Aurora, leaders also felt a social responsibility to help revitalize the village.

Wells President Lisa Marsh Ryerson notes, "Colleges and communities are discovering they can work together to achieve mutual goals. In recent years, Hamilton College, Colgate University, St. Lawrence University, and Syracuse University, among others, have formed partnerships with the communities where they are located. The result is economic, social, and cultural revitalization. I am pleased that Wells and the people of Aurora are working together to create a renaissance for the village."

Thanks to a partnership between Wells College and the Pleasant T. Rowland Foundation, the historic Aurora Inn, built by entrepreneur E.B. Morgan in 1833, will have a second life. A revitalized Inn, as well as a healthy local economy, is essential to help Wells College attract and retain talented students and remain a national leader in liberal arts education for women.

For more information contact Ann S. Rollo, Wells College vice president for external relations, at 315. 364. 3416.

February, 2002

 


 

 
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